NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


253 results for Tar Heel
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 17
Next
Record #:
6025
Abstract:
The Highland Games and Gathering of the Scottish Clans, held every year the second week in July at Grandfather Mountain, brings together descendants of 127 clans from around the world. The games feature bagpipe bands, track and field competitions, Highland dancing, and traditional Scottish events, including tossing of the cabar. They were organized in 1955.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p20-24, il
Record #:
6024
Author(s):
Abstract:
No one knows how Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County originated. The waters are quite shallow, being five feet at their deepest point. A number of individuals and groups are associated with the lake's history and include Algonquian Indians, English explorer John Lawson, visionary agribusinessmen, and the U.S. Department of the Interior.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p8-12, il
Record #:
6022
Abstract:
Covered bridges that once spanned waterways from the Coastal Plain to the Blue Ridge have almost disappeared, falling prey to neglect and the ravages of passing time. Muse describes the state's four remaining ones - Pisgah and Skeen's Mill bridges in Randolph County, Bunker Hill bridge near Claremont, Catawba County, and Rascoe's Mill bridge, Bertie County.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p11-12, 43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh novelist Ben Haas discusses writing, writers, and growing up in Charlotte in this TAR HEEL magazine interview. The son of a German immigrant, Haas has had over 50 books published in his 30 years of writing. Most were written under pseudonyms.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p8-11, por
Record #:
6026
Author(s):
Abstract:
The sinking of the S.S. Central America in a storm off Cape Hatteras on September 12, 1857, ranks as one of the greatest sea disasters of all time. Four hundred and eighty-two passengers and crew, including the captain, were lost. Also lost was $2 million in gold, which, at today's standard, is valued at $12 million. Treasure hunters have yet to recover any.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p10-13, 45, 57, il
Record #:
6062
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has some of the highest, most unusual, and picturesque waterfalls in the eastern United States. Almost 100 are found in the western counties in a triangle stretching from Linville to Brevard to Franklin. Williams describes a number of them, including Hickory Nut Falls, Horse Pasture, Linville Falls, and Dry Falls.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p19-21, 40-41, il
Record #:
6079
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina was the stronghold of downhome baseball during the period between the two world wars. The state had more than fifty minor league teams, more than any other state at that time. Williams recounts a time when the players had fun, the fans had a party every night, and the team owners made money, or at least didn't lose too much.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p10-12. 52, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6247
Abstract:
After the Civil War, John T. Patrick, North Carolina State Commissioner for Immigration, was ordered to seek ways to bring settlers into the state to help bolster the nearly non-existent economy wrecked by the war. He chose to build a town in the Moore County Sandhills. Huttenhauser describes the project, which, because of the obstacles the location presented, was called at the time Patrick's Folly. The was named Southern Pines.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p30-35, 44, il
Record #:
6250
Abstract:
George Holt is the director of the North Carolina Office of Folklife Programs. In this TAR HEEL interview he discusses what folklife and its appreciation in North Carolina is all about in the modern world. It is more than simple nostalgia, romance, or good times; it represents a total set of values and the image one has of oneself.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p12-13, 15-18, por
Record #:
6248
Abstract:
Apiculture, or beekeeping, attracts around 30,000 keepers in the state. However, only around a dozen or so keep bees on a large scale - over 300 hives. Only three states have more hives than North Carolina - California, Florida, and Texas. Waldorf discusses this fast-growing pastime in the state.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p39-41, il
Record #:
6249
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lifesaving Service was the forerunner of the United States Coast Guard. In North Carolina there were twenty-nine lifesaving stations covering the Outer Banks from Wash Wood to Cape Fear. The first seven were erected in 1874. Schenck describes life at a lifesaving station and some of the rescues.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p34-37, 39, il, por, map
Record #:
6256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte musician Arthur Smith is the subject of this TAR HEEL interview. Smith has been in show business for over forty years. He has composed over 1,500 songs, recorded 300 singles and sixty albums, and worked on five motion pictures. His syndicated country-western music television show is seen daily all over the Southeast.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p30-32, 63-64, por
Record #:
6257
Author(s):
Abstract:
Latta Place, the home of Scotsman James Latta in Mecklenburg County, was a thriving cotton and corn plantation around 1800. Deadwyler describes the architecture of the house, a Federal \"row house\" style seldom seen in either North or South Carolina at the beginning of the 19th-century.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p7-8, 46, il
Record #:
6253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Louise Thaden, 73, now lives in High Point. In the 1920s, she was a pioneer aviatrix, breaking international airplane records for altitude, speed, solo endurance, light plane speed, East-West speed, and 100-kilometer speed. She was the first woman to enter the Bendix Transcontinental race in 1936. She won first prize.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p48-49, il
Record #:
6255
Author(s):
Abstract:
Unexplained and unsolved mysteries have occurred in North Carolina over the centuries. One of them is the Brown Mountain Lights seen in Burke County as wavering, mysterious lights, rising above the mountain ridge, hovering, then fading away. To this day, no one has found an explanation for them.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p19-20, il, map