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8 results for Lakes--Hyde County
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Record #:
2809
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mattamuskeet Foundation, a nonprofit organization formed in 1995, will conduct several activities, including historical research, educational programs, and publication of a newsletter pertaining to Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Spring 1996, p4, il
Record #:
3828
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County is the state's largest freshwater lake. Over the years many unsuccessful attempts have been made to drain it for other uses. In 1934, the federal government created the Mattamuskeet Migratory Bird Refuge.
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Record #:
6024
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Abstract:
No one knows how Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County originated. The waters are quite shallow, being five feet at their deepest point. A number of individuals and groups are associated with the lake's history and include Algonquian Indians, English explorer John Lawson, visionary agribusinessmen, and the U.S. Department of the Interior.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p8-12, il
Record #:
6608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County is a body of fresh water approximately eighteen miles long and six miles wide. The lake bottom is said to contain seventy-five square miles of the richest soil in the world, rivaling that of the fertile Valley of the Nile. Draining the lake and turning it into farmland has challenged a number of people for over a century. Ward recounts the history of these drainage attempts, which date back to 1789.
Record #:
12268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet, eighteen miles long and six miles wide in coastal Hyde County, was once drained as a part of one of the greatest American agricultural experiments of the 20th century. The lake bottom is said to contain seventy-five square miles of the richest soil in the world, rivaling that of the fertile Valley of the Nile. Ultimately, heavy rains ruined the multi-million dollar project.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p23-25, 36, il
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Record #:
13502
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sparkling in the middle of a wilderness lies an unknown inland sea.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 34, Jan 1954, p3, 12, f
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Record #:
15362
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early years of the 20th-century, the water was pumped out of Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County. What remained was a vast agricultural area of unsurpassed richness six miles wide and 16 miles long. However, the pumps could not keep the water out, and the once fertile land is now under water again. The federal government has purchased the lake as a migratory waterfowl refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 26, Nov 1934, p5, 23, il
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Record #:
9460
Author(s):
Abstract:
No one knows how Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County originated. The waters are quite shallow, being five feet at their deepest point. At eighteen miles long and six miles wide, it is the state's largest freshwater lake. Total water surface is 40,000 acres. Stevenson discusses the history of the lake and what it is like in the different seasons.
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