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11 results for Lake Mattamuskeet--History
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Record #:
6024
Author(s):
Abstract:
No one knows how Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County originated. The waters are quite shallow, being five feet at their deepest point. A number of individuals and groups are associated with the lake's history and include Algonquian Indians, English explorer John Lawson, visionary agribusinessmen, and the U.S. Department of the Interior.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p8-12, il
Record #:
6608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County is a body of fresh water approximately eighteen miles long and six miles wide. The lake bottom is said to contain seventy-five square miles of the richest soil in the world, rivaling that of the fertile Valley of the Nile. Draining the lake and turning it into farmland has challenged a number of people for over a century. Ward recounts the history of these drainage attempts, which date back to 1789.
Record #:
12268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet, eighteen miles long and six miles wide in coastal Hyde County, was once drained as a part of one of the greatest American agricultural experiments of the 20th century. The lake bottom is said to contain seventy-five square miles of the richest soil in the world, rivaling that of the fertile Valley of the Nile. Ultimately, heavy rains ruined the multi-million dollar project.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p23-25, 36, il
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Record #:
15134
Author(s):
Abstract:
On two different occasions, vast sums of money have been spent in order to obliterate Lake Mattamuskeet through systems of pumping in order to use the land for crops. However, nature has refused to be conquered and the Lake has continually returned. In 1934, the Federal Government purchased the Lake as a migratory waterfowl refuge and black bass feeding ground.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 46, Apr 1941, p10-11, f
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Record #:
15424
Abstract:
Perhaps no geographic division of the world ever underwent so many changes, during a quarter of a century as Lake Mattamuskeet in Dare County. Originally, it was a natural game refuge with an abundant supply of fish and fowl. After two hundred years it its natural state, hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent in a venture to drain the lake and use it for agricultural purposes. After several years of inactivity, pumping has ceased and the Federal Government has turned Mattamuskeet Lake back into a thriving game refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 21, Oct 1936, p1, 16, 21, f
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Record #:
16965
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mattamuskeet refers to a group of Native Americans who, after losing in the Tuscarora War (1711-1715), were given land around the Mattamuskeet Lake in Hyde County. The group sold land to white developers and the population of the Mattamuskeet dwindles. The Mackeys Family, of Fairfield, was the only family in the late 1970s able to trace its lineage back to the first Mattamuskeet lands.
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Record #:
19376
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet, at 40,000 acres, is the largest natural lake in North Carolina. The lake is both economically and ecologically valuable, but activities like draining and canaling have altered the lake over time.
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Record #:
24597
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the country’s most valuable waterfowl preserves on Lake Mattamuskeet was started by J. A. (Lon) Bolich, Jr. in 1933. The author discusses how the preserve was founded.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 22, April 1965, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
8630
Author(s):
Abstract:
At eighteen miles long and six miles wide, Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County is the state's largest freshwater lake. Total water surface is 40,000 acres. Beginning in 1789, many unsuccessful attempts have been made to drain it for other uses, particularly farming. In 1933, the last draining attempt failed, and in 1934, the federal government created the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. The lake is a haven for many waterfowl, especially Canadian geese. In the 1960s, Mattamuskeet was briefly the goose hunting capital of the world, with over 130,000 geese wintering there. Over the years the population has declined, with only 17,000 wintering there in 1985.
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Record #:
38125
Abstract:
Since the late 19th century, this lake has provided hunting grounds for game birds such as geese, ducks, and swans. It has also provided opportunities for hunting guides, the well-known including John Harold Swindell and Percy Carawan. The hunting continues, albeit without guides, and game birds are in abundance, protected by the Wildlife Commission regulations.
Record #:
39413
Abstract:
From 1933-1942, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) worked at Camp Reddington on Bell Island on the Swanquarter Migratory Waterfowl Refuge in Hyde County. In 1934, the US government bought Lake Mattamuskeet from the New Holland Corporation and the Civilian Conservation Corps set about converting farm land to a migratory bird refuge. They erected fences, built canals, dismantled houses and barns, put in roads, erected barracks, planted vegetation to feed the migratory birds. The Civilian Conservation Corps moved from Camp Reddington to the New Holland community at Lake Mattamuskeet. The Civilian Conservation Corps ended at the outbreak of WWII.