NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


44 results for Lighthouses
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
1289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last week Durham played host to the Creating Change Conference, the country's largest gay political gathering, whose attendants urged the gay movement to link itself to the struggle of other minority groups.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 46, Nov 1993, p10, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1314
Abstract:
North Carolina lighthouses, such as Currituck Lighthouse, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, and Cape Lookout Lighthouse, have a rich and treasured history for citizens and sailors alike.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
1478
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State Health Plan Purchasing Alliance (SHPPA) applies the old idea of the food co-op to health insurance. By banding together, small businesses (in this case, two to forty-nine employees) hope to save money on health insurance.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p32-34, il
Record #:
2250
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Archives and History's Historic Sites Section is celebrating its fortieth anniversary as a separate entity in state government.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
2340
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tort reform movement in the General Assembly will limit punitive damage awards to the victims of dangerous products or company negligence. Opponents question whether such reform will really benefit victims and not companies who put profit over safety.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 23, June 1995, p11-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2662
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among the collectibles that the late Emmett Wiggins placed on his Edenton property is the Roanoke River Lighthouse. Well over 100 years old, the rare lighthouse is thought to be one of the last in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 8, Jan 1996, p16-17,19, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2836
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state has twenty-two historic sites, including Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery County and Bennett Place in Durham, that interpret the past for visitors and relate it to present-day life.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Apr 1996, p24-27, il
Full Text:
Record #:
3265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Six historic and distinctive lighthouses, including those at capes Hatteras and Lookout, Bodie Island, and Ocracoke, guide mariners along the state's 301-mile coastline.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
3301
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound near Mount Gilead in Montgomery County is one of the most carefully excavated and reconstructed Native American mounds in the nation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 12, May 1989, p32-35, il
Full Text:
Record #:
3464
Author(s):
Abstract:
The use of volunteers in the state's public schools is increasing, but a number of school systems do not have policies governing their use. An official policy is a necessity to define the volunteers' responsibilities and things they could be liable for.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
3664
Author(s):
Abstract:
For two hundred years, seven lighthouses from Corolla to Southport have sent their beams into the darkness to provide a safe guide for passing ships. Oak Island Lighthouse, built in 1958, has the world's second- brightest beacon.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The eight coastal lighthouses are among the state's best-known symbols. However, they are not the state's only lights. Beacon lights were used at Ocracoke Inlet as early as 1715, and through the years, almost 30 other lighthouses and light ships have guided mariners. Most have been lost to warfare, neglect, and weather, so that only eight remain at the end of the 20th-century.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4560
Abstract:
While many people know the state's seven famous coastal lighthouses, few know that in the 19th-century North Carolina had dozens of sound and river lighthouses. Standing twelve feet above the water, these two-story, four-sided structures of a 1,000 square feet functioned like today's highway markers. The lighthouses at Croatan River, Roanoke Marshes River, Long Shoal River, Neuse River, Roanoke River, and Pamlico Point are profiled.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4557
Abstract:
North Carolina's seven lighthouses - Currituck Beach, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras, Ocracoke, Cape Lookout, Bald Head, and Oak Island - are profiled.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4813
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pee Dee Indians vanished from the Sandhills in the 1400s and their culture lay buried beneath cornfields in Montgomery County until 1937, when the state recognized the value of the site and purchased it. Excavated for nearly fifty years by Joffre Coe, the Town Creek Indian Mound is the only North Carolina Historic Site devoted exclusively to Native American history. The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
Source:
Full Text: