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9 results for Shelton-Roberts, Cheryl
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Record #:
3975
Abstract:
Seaboard Airline Railroad built the Hamlet Railroad Station in 1900. It handled numerous passengers and was also the point where Seaboard's main north-south and east-west lines crossed. A century later, in 1999, few trains come, the station's former passenger trains replaced by airlines.
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Record #:
4136
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In 1868, Dexter Stetson, an experienced lighthouse builder, came from New England to build lighthouses at Cape Hatteras and Bodie Island. His work finished, he vanished into history. Now one hundred years to the date of his death, the man who built the East Coast's best lighthouses has been rediscovered.
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Record #:
5032
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The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is one of the nation's most well-known sea coast sentinels. An oral history project of Shelton-Roberts's records the history of people who called the lighthouse their home during the early days of the 20th century. There are over 1,200 direct descendants of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse keepers, and their stories reveal much about life on this remote island.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 12, May 2001, p62-70, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
5740
Abstract:
On March 7, 1962, a powerful nor'easter of huge proportions struck the Outer Banks on Ash Wednesday. Shelton-Roberts describes the fury of the storm, its origins, and aftermath.
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Record #:
7193
Abstract:
William Henry Chase Whiting, a brilliant engineer and West Point graduate in the class of 1845, designed and oversaw the construction of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. He finished the structure in the fall of 1859. The light flashed for the first time on November 1, 1859, just a few days after John Brown's attack at Harper's Ferry. At the outbreak of war, Whiting joined the Confederate Army and in 1862 was promoted to brigadier general. He was mortally wounded in 1865, during the massive assault by Union forces on Fort Fisher outside Wilmington. Whiting's design was so successful that after the Civil War three other lighthouses in the state - Cape Hatteras, Bodie Island, and Currituck Beach - followed its design.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p106-109, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4111
Abstract:
Until the 1820s, flames reflecting off a mirrored surface fired lighthouse beacons around the world. Around 1815, French civil engineer Augustin Fresnel designed a system to use prisms to refract light and focus a powerful beam. The United States resisted using the new system for years, until it proved to be cost- effective. The first of four Fresnel lenses was installed at Cape Hatteras in 1854. Fresnel lenses were used at Hatteras until 1935, when the lighthouse closed.
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Record #:
4561
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In 1890, the U.S. Government awarded experienced marine contractors Anderson & Barr of New Jersey a contract to build a lighthouse on Diamond Shoals, nine miles off Cape Hatteras. The Shoals, an area of strong undersea currents and shifting sands, has doomed many a ship and mariner. It was more than a match for the contractors, despite their heroic efforts. Unable to keep the lighthouse base level because of shifting sands, the workforce withdrew on July 4, 1891, in the face of a hurricane which destroyed the remains of the lighthouse.
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Record #:
4560
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While many people know the state's seven famous coastal lighthouses, few know that in the 19th-century North Carolina had dozens of sound and river lighthouses. Standing twelve feet above the water, these two-story, four-sided structures of a 1,000 square feet functioned like today's highway markers. The lighthouses at Croatan River, Roanoke Marshes River, Long Shoal River, Neuse River, Roanoke River, and Pamlico Point are profiled.
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Record #:
4557
Abstract:
North Carolina's seven lighthouses - Currituck Beach, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras, Ocracoke, Cape Lookout, Bald Head, and Oak Island - are profiled.
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