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7 results for Pee Dee Indians--North Carolina--Antiquities
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Record #:
3301
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Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound near Mount Gilead in Montgomery County is one of the most carefully excavated and reconstructed Native American mounds in the nation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 12, May 1989, p32-35, il
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Record #:
4813
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Abstract:
The Pee Dee Indians vanished from the Sandhills in the 1400s and their culture lay buried beneath cornfields in Montgomery County until 1937, when the state recognized the value of the site and purchased it. Excavated for nearly fifty years by Joffre Coe, the Town Creek Indian Mound is the only North Carolina Historic Site devoted exclusively to Native American history. The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
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Record #:
6270
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound, a state historic site near Mt. Gilead in Montgomery County, is one of the most important Native American sites in the area. The site represents the northernmost reach of the Mound People along the eastern seaboard. The authors discuss the activities at this on-going archaeological site.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p11-12, il
Record #:
18670
Author(s):
Abstract:
Archaeological investigations at sites such as Payne and Town Creek explore remains of the Pee Dee culture, which brought a new mode of life to the North Carolina mountains that included larger villages, agriculture, and specific ceremonies.
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Record #:
4387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ancestors of the Cherokees inhabited the southern Appalachians beginning around 1000 A.D., some 500 years before European explorers reached the New World. Archaeologists call these people the Pisgah Culture. The majority lived in villages in Buncombe and Haywood Counties, while others lived in the mountains of North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee. These people were both hunters and farmers.
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Record #:
4691
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Abstract:
In downtown Franklin in Macon County stands a tall, grassy mound, about 20 feet high and 450 feet around the base. The Nikwasi Mound, built a thousand years ago by the Cherokees, was a sacred ceremonial site in the center of their village on the Little Tennessee River. Town residents purchased the mound in 1946 to preserve it. Today Nikwasi and the Town Creek Mound near Mount Gilead are the state's only two mounds that are protected and open to the public.
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Record #:
2301
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before English colonists arrived, Native Americans had lived in the state 12,000 years. Thirty tribes totaling 100,000 occupied the state in the late 1500s, but colonial wars and diseases rapidly decreased that number to 20,000 in 1800.
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