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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Yocum, Thomas
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Record #:
2933
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The Cape Hatteras National Seashore and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have proposed a fourth groin, a low sea wall set at a right angle, to control erosion that threatens historic Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 2, July 1996, p4, il
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Record #:
2988
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Nearly fifty years old on some parts, N.C. Highway 12 connects the Outer Banks' towns of Corolla and Ocracoke. A vital lifeline for residents, the road is constantly the prey of shifting sands and ocean overwash.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Aug 1996, p30-32, il
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Record #:
3222
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A number of Outer Banks artists, including Russell Yerkes, Chris and Nancy Nolan, James Melvin, and Denver Lindley, Jr., find inspiration for their work in the images between Ocracoke and Sanderling.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 10, Mar 1997, p16-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
3414
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Driving the 112-mile length of Highway 12, which connects Ocracoke and Corolla on the Outer Banks, affords people some of the most beautiful coastal views in the country and a sense of yesterday.
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Record #:
3665
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The perilous Atlantic waters have claimed many ships and lives off the Outer Banks from the 1500s onward. Beginning in 1870, the U.S. Life- Saving Service fought the oceans to rescue mariners. In the next thirty years, Outer Bankers earned 56 medals for bravery.
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Record #:
3664
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For two hundred years, seven lighthouses from Corolla to Southport have sent their beams into the darkness to provide a safe guide for passing ships. Oak Island Lighthouse, built in 1958, has the world's second- brightest beacon.
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Record #:
3801
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Powerful, destructive hurricanes have buffeted the state for centuries and seem to come in cycles. In the 1950s, the state was nicknamed \"Hurricane Alley\" when six strong storms struck in seven years. Hazel was the strongest ever. Now, after decades of relative calm, forecasters feel the cycle is returning, with Hugo, Bertha, and Fran being forerunners.
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Record #:
3996
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On December 17, 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright achieved the first heavier-than-air flight at Kitty Hawk. Few in the nation took the report seriously, and it was not until 1908, that the full realization of what the Wright Brothers had accomplished was understood by their countrymen.
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Record #:
4204
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Visitors to Roanoke Island can enjoy cultural and historical attractions. Algonquian Indians, English explorers, Lost Colony settlers, runaway slaves and Civil War soldiers have left their imprints in passing. The Elizabethan Gardens, 16th-century sailing ship Elizabeth II, North Carolina Aquarium, and the towns of Wanchese and Manteo offer a slow pace to the hustle and bustle of nearby Outer Banks communities.
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Record #:
4283
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the nation occurred at John Reed's farm twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers poured in, transforming sleepy Charlotte into a boomtown. In the 1820s, the state produced all of the native gold coined by the U.S. Mint, over a million dollars. By 1849, the gold seekers were heading for California, and the boom faded. Today the John Reed Gold Mine, a National Historic Landmark and State Historic Site, is the state's third-most visited historic site.
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Record #:
4465
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Fiberglass has generally replaced wood as the main boatbuilding material. Still, in a few areas in Hyde County, like Gull Rock and Lake Landing, people like Mike Mullen and Robert Ross carry on the wooden boatbuilding tradition, building a few new boats and restoring the classic old ones.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p20-22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4558
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Between 1874 and 1875, Nathaniel Bishop sailed 2,500 miles in nine months, from the St. Lawrence River to the Gulf of Mexico, in a 58-pound paper canoe he called Maria Theresa. As he sailed down the Outer Banks, barely ten years after the end of the Civil War, he chronicled the life of the people there.
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Record #:
4562
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Today the Outer Banks are a tourist magnet. However, in the early 1920s, tourists weren't interested because the area lacked bridges, good roads, places to eat and sleep, and interesting activities. What the Outer Banks did have were visionaries like Washington Baum and Frank Stick, who pushed for these things, and Aycock Brown, first director of the Dare County Tourist Bureau, who put the Outer Banks on the map with his endless publicity.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p74-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4673
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Many areas of the stare are so well-lit through growth and development that stargazing is difficult. There are areas, however, where light pollution doesn't reach, like country lanes, mountain tops, and parts of the Outer Banks. Yocum includes a list of North Carolina cities with planetariums where one can learn basic astronomy and the names of a number of astronomical clubs in the state.
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Record #:
4725
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Hurricanes have struck North Carolina for centuries, destroying lives, property, and the environment. However, it is only recently that scientists seek to understand a hurricane's ecological effect. For example, Hurricane Floyd's flood washed human and natural contaminants into the Pamlico Sound; the sound's salinity also decreased 50 percent, and the chlorophyll level elevated. Scientists are studying these and other effects to learn what it means for the future of the sound and those who depend on it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p98-102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
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