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34 results for Hurricanes
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Record #:
191
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The hurricane of August 19, 1879, destroyed the Beaufort waterfront and razed the Atlantic Hotel.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p14-15, il
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Record #:
422
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The HOME, a celebrated New York steamship, proved to be no match for a hurricane off Ocracoke in 1837.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 1, June 1992, p14-16, il
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Record #:
2994
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Hurricane Bertha, which struck the eastern part of the state in July, 1996, left her mark on a number of towns, including Emerald Isle, New Bern, Southport, Beaufort, and Wrightsville Beach.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Aug 1996, p4-5, il
Record #:
3084
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Hurricanes have been a threat to the state for centuries. In 1752, a powerful storm destroyed the town of Johnston, then the county seat of Onslow County, taking lives and property, and bringing government to a halt by scattering deeds and other documents.
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Record #:
3801
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Powerful, destructive hurricanes have buffeted the state for centuries and seem to come in cycles. In the 1950s, the state was nicknamed \"Hurricane Alley\" when six strong storms struck in seven years. Hazel was the strongest ever. Now, after decades of relative calm, forecasters feel the cycle is returning, with Hugo, Bertha, and Fran being forerunners.
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Record #:
4160
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Before Hurricane Fran, Hazel was one of the most powerful storms to strike the state. The beaches of Brunswick County were hardest hit. Huge waves driven by 150 mph winds swept away hundreds of buildings. At Long Beach only 5 of 357 buildings survived. In the ensuing years Hazel was the benchmark against which other storms were measured.
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Record #:
4381
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Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd, plus subsequent flooding, battered many of Eastern Carolina's historic sites and museums, but most survived. The CSS Neuse in Kinston was the most severely damaged. Other sites suffering damage were Fort Fisher, Brunswick Town, the Aycock Birthplace, and Historic Halifax.
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Record #:
4391
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two major hurricanes, Dennis and Floyd, ravaged Eastern Carolina in 1999. While damage to man-made structures can be quickly assessed, damage to the environment over the long- term remains unknown. Early assessments reveal a drop in the oxygen content of the Neuse and other rivers, which can cause fish kills. Also observable is the large amount of freshwater that had flowed into the Pamlico and Core sounds, which promotes the growth of freshwater algae.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p16-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4390
Author(s):
Abstract:
The high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1899 drove residents of Shackleford Banks and Ca'e (Cape) Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City and Harkers Island, where they built new homes and continued their community traditions. Green chronicles the return of their descendants to the Banks to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the storm.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4726
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A hurricane is a force to respect and pay attention to for residents of Ocracoke Island, which lies far from the mainland and barely above sea level. Yocum, an Ocracoke Island resident, describes the islanders' reactions to the formation of a storm, preparations for it, and the eventual arrival of the hurricane.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p107-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5294
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Some homes survive the powerful winds and water of a hurricane; others do not. Green discusses how homes can be improved through building techniques, including new designs for plywood shutters and strong rooms.
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Record #:
5737
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Since the late 19th-century, over 60 hurricane strikes have been recorded in North Carolina. Barnes describes five memorable ones: the hurricane of 1879; San Ciriaco, August 16-18, 1899; Hurricane Hazel, October 15, 1954; Hurricane Fran, September 5-6, 1996; Hurricane Floyd, September 16, 1999.
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Record #:
5983
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Coastal North Carolina, including the vulnerable barrier islands, has been struck by 33 major hurricanes between 1899 and 1971. Richardson provides a list of the storms and damage produced, discusses what is currently being done to protect the islands, and makes recommendations for a new hurricane policy, including land use planning.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Summer 1976, p7-16, il, map, f
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Record #:
6193
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Between August 30, 1954, and September 19, 1955, six hurricanes - Carol, Edna, Hazel, Connie, Diane, and Ione - struck on or near North Carolina. In their wake was death and destruction. Edgerton summarizes each storm, listing path, power, and destruction.
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Record #:
8044
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Hurricanes striking North Carolina have not devastated large population centers as Hurricane Katrina did in New Orleans. Still, the state has had its share of disasters from Fran, Floyd, Bonnie, Dennis, and Isabel. Katrina exposed serious deficiencies in hurricane response at the Federal level. This in turn places more responsibility on county and state emergency managers. Secret discusses what needs to be done and what state and local officials are doing to stay ahead of the coming storms.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 25, June 2006, p16-17, il Periodical Website
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