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19 results for Hairr, John
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Record #:
2538
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Through the efforts of Margaret Jordan-Ellis, the historic Deep River Camelback Bridge in the Lee County community of Cunnocle has been saved and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 5, Oct 1995, p4, il
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Record #:
3084
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Hurricanes have been a threat to the state for centuries. In 1752, a powerful storm destroyed the town of Johnston, then the county seat of Onslow County, taking lives and property, and bringing government to a halt by scattering deeds and other documents.
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Record #:
5265
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In February 1898, a great fire raged through central North Carolina and into South Carolina. Hairr describes this forest fire which consumed over three million acres.
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Record #:
7364
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The Great North Carolina Hurricane of 1815, as it came to be known, made landfall on September 3, 1815, along the Onslow County coast. Hairr recounts the destructive path the storm took through eastern North Carolina before exiting out to sea in the vicinity of Norfolk, Virginia.
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Record #:
7792
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North Carolina's first light tower stood on a lonely sandbar between Core Banks and Ocracoke Island to guide sailors through the ever-shifting channel of Ocracoke Inlet.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p128-130, 132, 134, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7934
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Around 150 years ago the longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles. The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road followed a course originally laid out by Dr. Elisha Mitchell. Hairr recounts the history and construction of the road.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p76-78, 80, 82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7992
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On April 21, 1913, a meteorite slammed into Moore County about three miles from the town of Carthage. It was not very big, weighing slightly over four pounds and measuring about the size of a large man's fist. George Calvin Graves, who owned the land where the meteorite landed, took it home, and there it remained for the next twenty-one years. In 1934, Harry T. Davis, curator of geology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences came to see it and later took it to the Smithsonian Institution. Over the years scientists around the world have studied the “Moore County,” seeking to learn more about its origin and composition. Meteorites are named for places where they are found. Part of the Moore County meteorite is now in the Smithsonian Institution, and the remainder is in the NC Museum of Natural Sciences.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p27-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8122
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By the late 1880s and early 1900s, accessible forests in the state's eastern sections had been cleared by loggers. Much of the remaining virgin forests lay in the remote, rugged western counties. Transporting this timber to market was neither safe nor economical. To overcome this problem, flumes were developed. A flume is a wooden trough, built in a V-shaped manner and filled with water, by which the logs could be transported safely and efficiently. They resembled train trestles and could reach heights of forty feet. In 1907, the Giant Lumber Company constructed the longest flume ever built in North Carolina. It reached nineteen miles across Wilkes County from the company lumberyard into the vast timber properties. In June 1916, a catastrophic flood, produced by a hurricane, washed the flume out in several places. The flume was never rebuilt.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p124-126, 128-129, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8236
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There are over fifty mountains in North Carolina that reach heights of over 6,000 feet, making the state the home of the highest ranges on the East Coast. Hairr describes a number of them, including Great Balsam Mountains, Plott Balsam Mountains, Great Craggy Mountains. Unaka Mountains, Black Mountains, and the Great Smoky Mountains.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p42-44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8859
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In 1913, an unidentified mammal washed up on Bird Shoal Island, located inside the entrance to Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast. It was a whale that measured sixteen feet long and had a beak, but what kind of whale was it? Eventually the remains reached the Smithsonian Institution where Frederick W. True, the nation's foremost expert on marine mammals, realized the remains were from an undocumented species. Since he was first to describe the new species, he assigned its official Latin name--Mesoplodon mirus. The whale is commonly called True's beaked whale. In 1940, a pregnant beaked whale was found along the Outer Banks and examined by North Carolina's famed naturalist H. H. Brimley. It would be eighty years later, on May 29, 1993, before beaked whales were seen in the wild. Appropriately the sighting was off the Outer Banks, forty-five miles southeast of Hatteras Inlet. Since 1993, other sightings have been rare, and the creature remains one of the most elusive of the ocean's mammals.
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Record #:
8941
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North Carolina ranks second in the total number of reported fatalities and fourth in reported injuries from lightning strikes. Between 1959 and 2004, lightning killed 182 people in the state and injured an additional 550 who survived. The high incidence of strikes is directly related to the large number of North Carolinians who engage in outdoor activities, either for work or pleasure. In 1907, fifty Cape Fear Power Company construction workers in Chatham County took refuge in a building as a storm approached; lightning struck the structure, killing seven and injuring the rest. This record stood until 1961, when lightning struck a Sampson County tobacco barn, killing eight and injuring four. The record of eight deaths from a single lightning bolt remains unsurpassed in the nation.
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Record #:
9443
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In 1754, Hugh Waddell left a life of destitution in Ireland and came to North Carolina to seek his fortune. He would become the highest ranking military leader in the province. In October 2007, a monument commemorating his accomplishments will be dedicated at the Fort Dobbs State Historic Site in Statesville.
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Record #:
9694
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Tornadoes, with winds which can reach 300 miles per hour, are one of the most violent storms that pass through North Carolina. Since the National Weather Service began recording them in 1950, only Ashe, Mitchell, and Polk counties have never experienced one. The state has averaged twenty-five tornados a year for the past thirty years. This ranks the state nationally 23rd in the number of yearly tornados and 20th in the number of tornado-related deaths.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 9, Feb 2008, p140-144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10276
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Some of the most interesting lakes in the eastern United States lie in North Carolina's Coastal Plain and include Lake Mattamuskeet, Lake Phelps, and the mysterious Carolina Bays.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 4, Sept 2008, p44-46, 48-50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21364
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Colonel David Fanning was a partisan loyalist leader in North Carolina during the American Revolution. Among his successes were the capture of North Carolina's Governor in Hillsborough and the capture of Colonel Philip Alston at the House in the Horseshoe. Hairr explains why Fanning is buried under Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Digby, Nova Scotia.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall 2003, p12, il