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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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25 results for Roads--Design and construction
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Record #:
96
Abstract:
Now that I-40 traverses the entire state, communities must make a concerted effort to benefit from the highway, and must develop strategies for making the highway pay optimal dividends.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 1991, p7-12, il
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Record #:
620
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Abstract:
Lancaster provides information on the top highway contractors in North Carolina and their economic impact.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 7, July 1990, p40-44, il
Record #:
4688
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Abstract:
Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Gov. Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Record #:
4684
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Abstract:
North Carolina's top ten road construction projects are forging ahead to relieve traffic growth and congestion. Most will be completed in the next five years, although two will be finished in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Total cost of construction is $3.9 billion. Projects include the Charlotte and Raleigh Outer Loops, Greensboro Bypass, I-40 Widening, and bypasses around Jacksonville, Wilson, and Manteo.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 7, July 2000, p20-21, 23-25, il
Record #:
5468
Abstract:
North Carolina's top ten road construction projects are forging ahead to relieve traffic growth and construction. Rafferty discusses progress on the ten projects, including the Manteo Bypass and the Raleigh Outer Loop.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 7, July 2002, p46, 48-53, il
Record #:
7934
Author(s):
Abstract:
Around 150 years ago the longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles. The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road followed a course originally laid out by Dr. Elisha Mitchell. Hairr recounts the history and construction of the road.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p76-78, 80, 82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10015
Abstract:
Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The article presents a brief history of the development of the state's road system up to 1943. At that date the highway system covered 60,000 miles of public roads, with about 12,000 miles being hard-surfaced.
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Record #:
10876
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Abstract:
The 1850s was the heyday for plank roads in North Carolina. Around a dozen roads were built with a total mileage of 500 miles. The longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 17, Feb 1968, p9-10, il
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Record #:
11130
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Abstract:
Nello Teer Company of Durham is building the 20-mile, $38 million project to extend Interstate 40 from Interstate 85 at Durham to Raleigh through the Research Triangle Park. Completion of the project will ease congestion on traffic-heavy U.S. 70 between the two cities.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 7, July 1972, p67-68, il, map
Record #:
13882
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Abstract:
A proposed highway that would connect Nag's Head with Atlantic Beach could open North Carolina's sea coast to motorists. Gaining interest from the Morehead City Chamber of Commerce as well as interests lying on the southern Outer Banks, it is undetermined whether or not the complete highway will be constructed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 51, May 1953, p20-21, map
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Record #:
14308
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The article looks at early advancement of road construction along the eastern North Carolina shore. Such infrastructure was seen as a means of opening tourism which would draw visitors from Norfolk. In this article, virtues of the northeastern North Carolina are outlined from the rich duck hunting grounds in Currituck Sound to the scenic, underdeveloped beaches.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 31, Jan 1949, p6-7, 20, il
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Record #:
15752
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Abstract:
The new technology in road building in the state in the 1850s was the plank road. When one was built from Fayetteville to Winston, a distance of over one hundred miles, the people of that time considered it a great engineering feat. Robins's article includes a contract with specifications for the construction of a seven-mile stretch of this road in Randolph County, between Asheboro and High Point. The contract was signed on January 3, 1852.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 10, Aug 1935, p10
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Record #:
17212
Abstract:
Recent considerations were given to the care and construction of roads and highways in North Carolina, including erosion control, street signs, and post-war maintenance.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Mar 1944, p1-10, il, f
Record #:
23895
Author(s):
Abstract:
After twenty-seven years of construction, Interstate 485, a bypass around Charlotte, finally opened in June 2015. Most city- and suburb-dwelling residents welcomed the road's completion, but the interstate threatens the lifestyle of families who have owned nearby farmland for generations.
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Record #:
24391
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The Outer Loop in Charlotte was once envisioned as the solution to traffic congestion, but many leaders think of it as only a temporary solution. This article examines the possible future of the Outer Loop and how developers capitalized on the beltway.