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12 results for Interstate highway system
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Record #:
2764
Abstract:
The Intermodal Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 designated I 73/74 as the roads that will become the state's North/South interstate corridor.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p10, il
Record #:
8229
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 29, 1956, President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, which created the interstate highway system. Five interstate highways, totaling 1,083 miles, cross North Carolina. Lail examines benefits and problems for towns that lie near interstate highways.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 56 Issue 8, Aug 2006, p1, 8-9, il
Record #:
10903
Abstract:
As of June 1969, North Carolina has been allocated just over 837 miles of the national interstate system. Of that total, 450.3 miles are open; 125 miles are under construction; and the state highway department is acquiring the right-of-way for an additional 115 miles.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 7, July 1969, p52-54, il, map
Record #:
11130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nello Teer Company of Durham is building the 20-mile, $38 million project to extend Interstate 40 from Interstate 85 at Durham to Raleigh through the Research Triangle Park. Completion of the project will ease congestion on traffic-heavy U.S. 70 between the two cities.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 7, July 1972, p67-68, il, map
Record #:
30640
Author(s):
Abstract:
The construction of the United States interstate highway will have an economic impact felt across the country. In addition to a boom in the asphalt industry and highway construction equipment, it is hoped that the highway program will also spur the steel industry, cut driving time and costs, and save lives with quicker access.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p18-20, 22, 85, por
Record #:
30641
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the construction of the interstate highway system, the Bureau of Public Roads has issued a statement about the benefits of the program and its development. In addition to providing more jobs for construction and industry support, the interstate highway program also provides increased safety, quicker traveling times, and community development.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p24-25, 27, 96, por
Record #:
30639
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States has an extensive system of interstate and defense highways, which serve all manner of economic and social activities. Although the route passes through the main industrial routes of the country, it is supplemented by state highways and routes the provide access to other regions.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p12-14, 16, 83, map
Record #:
30648
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the upcoming highway construction across the United States, steel, cement, bituminous and aggregate materials will be required in the millions of tons. Along with increased productivity, increased man power will also be needed, providing jobs for millions of laborers.
Source:
Record #:
30670
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although federal aid will help North Carolina with the highway development, it will not completely solve the problem of modernizing the primary road system. Nearly 3000 miles of roads in the state system need improvement, which will cost over $305 million to complete.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 14 Issue 6, November 1956, p52, 54, 56, 58, 90, por
Record #:
30669
Author(s):
Abstract:
Under the proposed Federal Highway Program, states like North Carolina will receive a substantial portion funds for the development of the interstate and defense highway system in the state. North Carolina will receive over $903 million for the 13 year program that does toward the development of 718 miles of highway across the state.
Record #:
31305
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three decades ago, when President Eisenhower proposed a national system of defense highways, no one dreamed that it would take this long to complete Interstate 40 from the western North Carolina mountains to the coast. Now, funds for completion of I-40 from Raleigh to Wilmington are coming available. The completed highway is expected to drastically improve economic development in eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
31492
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to improved highway mileage, the Interstate Program has the benefit of the Appalachian Developmental Highway System. The Appalachia system is set up in the 12-state Appalachian region, 200 miles of which North Carolina contributes to developmental highways and $120 million in federal funds.
Source: