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10 results for Highway planning
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Record #:
96
Abstract:
Now that I-40 traverses the entire state, communities must make a concerted effort to benefit from the highway, and must develop strategies for making the highway pay optimal dividends.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 1991, p7-12, il
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Record #:
15322
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Abstract:
The State Highway Commission was authorized in 1915 and in 1921 financed all bridge construction within the state. Prior to this state level organization cities and counties had to construct bridges. Mr. Wm. L. Craven, hired in 1916, remained one of the head bridge engineers for the department.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 16, Sept 1937, p10-11, il
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Record #:
16007
Abstract:
Americans use the interstate highway system as a means of escape from natural disasters, but these roads may offer false hope with regard to escaping terrorist attacks. Such disasters require a different and creative approach to prevent chaos and the overuse of the highway system in evacuating metropolitan regions which could potentially lead to other harmful consequences.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Winter 2005, p33-39, bibl, f
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Record #:
25226
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Abstract:
The Executive Director of the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation delivered a speech about history of the PTRF and the importance of what the PTRF has to say about the proposed highway improvements in Eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Summer 1998, p4-5
Record #:
25529
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1987 Transportation Corridor Official Map Act (Map Act) may save North Carolina money on future highways, but many landowners pay the price. Any development located in the path of major Map Act projects are restricted or frozen – many for decades. Currently, there is a lawsuit in the North Carolina Supreme Court to decide whether property of Map Act owners was unconstitutionally seized by the Department of Transportation (DOT) without compensation. In all, 24 planned roads affect property owners in 18 counties throughout the state.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, April 2016, p50-59, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30638
Author(s):
Abstract:
State wide, the North Carolina Highway Commission is responsible for maintenance and improvement of over 10,000 miles of primary city highway; 54,000 miles of secondary roads, and 2450 miles of primary and secondary links between towns and cities. With over 68,000 miles under their supervision, North Carolina has the most extensive highway system under state control in the United States.
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Record #:
30888
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Highway Commission was authorized to spend over $197 million for maintenance and construction of highways in the state during the next biennium ending in 1961. This amounted to a 2.3% increase from the previous year. Salary increases and administrative costs, along with other non-highway projects such as the state prison management, will take up a bulk of the revenue earned from gasoline, motor, and other taxes.
Record #:
31305
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three decades ago, when President Eisenhower proposed a national system of defense highways, no one dreamed that it would take this long to complete Interstate 40 from the western North Carolina mountains to the coast. Now, funds for completion of I-40 from Raleigh to Wilmington are coming available. The completed highway is expected to drastically improve economic development in eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
31492
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to improved highway mileage, the Interstate Program has the benefit of the Appalachian Developmental Highway System. The Appalachia system is set up in the 12-state Appalachian region, 200 miles of which North Carolina contributes to developmental highways and $120 million in federal funds.
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Record #:
34209
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Abstract:
A study by the North Carolina State University Center for Transportation determined that thirty-five miles of highways on North Carolina’s Outer Banks are vulnerable to service disruption from coastal erosion, wave overwash, sand deposits, flooding, or undermining. Maintaining transportation service by relocation, beach nourishment, causeway construction, or shoreline hardening will cost the state $99 million between 1990 and 2010.