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17 results for Coastal management
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Record #:
15827
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One of the most controversial natural resource management issues in North Carolina has been the debate surrounding the future of the Currituck Outer Banks. As one of the last remaining undeveloped and privately owned barrier island stretches on the East Coast, this debate, between environmentalists, developers, planners, and governments, has taken on national significance.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p44-52, map, f
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Record #:
16684
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Leutze discusses the shortcomings of the 2007 Presidential budget as it fails to provide money for beach renourishment, inlet dredging, or Intracoastal Waterway maintenance.
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Record #:
16692
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Recent approaches to coastal issues are taking on an interdisciplinary and cooperative approach in order to solve complex issues.
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Record #:
16702
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Another report card for the North Carolina coast has been published by the North Carolina Beach Inlet and Waterway Association. Overall, the coast received a "C."
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Record #:
16724
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Put together by the Marine Fisheries Commission, Coastal Resources Commission, and Environmental Management Commission have developed the Coastal Habitat Protection Plan for North Carolina in order to prevent further coastal change and risk.
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Record #:
16737
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Although there are various issues facing North Carolina's coast, such as limited funds, increased building, and potential oil drilling, there are organizations making an effort to build on limited funds and get citizens involved.
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Record #:
18986
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Coastal development requires a balanced approach to both stimulate economic development while also preserving natural resources. In 1972, plans for development in Currituck County were halted to allow a team of architects, engineers, ecologists, economists, and local officials create a thorough, multi-disciplinary plan for the county's coastal land use. Specifics of their plan and potential use as a model for the entire state's coastal region are discussed.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 5; 6, May/June 1973, p7-22, il
Record #:
25002
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The coast is constantly changing. This is a problem when you have people living on it. However, new research is being conducted on marsh grass as a possible aid in preventing moving shorelines and dunes.
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Record #:
25000
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When summer arrives, it brings with it many a tourist. However, this means that the coast will need to be even more protected. $1.4 million has been designated with this task.
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Record #:
25076
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An overview of some of the projects being funded by Sea Grant for the next two years includes topics on healthy coastal ecosystems, hazard resilience in coastal communities, sustainable coastal development, and safe and sustainable seafood supply.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2010, p12-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27332
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From Seeds to Shoreline is a K-12 program which teaches students about estuarine habitats and marsh restoration. As part of the program, students from Beaufort Elementary School in Beaufort, NC planted smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) at the living shoreline demonstration site on Pivers Island. The program helps students understand natural systems, their connections to the systems, and the benefits of the systems which filter pollutants, stabilize shoreline, and provide nurseries for commercial fishing.
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Record #:
27566
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Dave Owens is the former director of the Division of Coastal Management. Owens helped create the Estuarine Sanctuary Program and pushed coastal-development regulation. Committed to protecting North Carolina’s coastal habitats and communities who depend on those habitats, Owens worked hard to resist pressure to weaken regulations for developers. He was forced out of his position and now works at UNC’s Institute for Government, but continues to be a role model for coastal management leaders.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28441
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Preparing coastal communities for varied hazards continues to be a priority for North Carolina Sea Grant. This involves planning for and responding to a variety of economic and environmental challenges.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2017, p6-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28839
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Issues on the North Carolina coast are complex, involving property rights, public interest, resource allocation, state and federal responsibilities, and difficult questions regarding scientific predictions. Recent developments in state coastal projects include erosion prevention options and coastal habitat protection plans.
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Record #:
32319
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Roy G. Sowers, Jr. of Sanford is Director of the North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development. In an interview, Sowers discusses the department’s mission to both develop and conserve natural resources. He also discusses the issues facing the state’s coastal and marine resources, commercial fishing, and industrial development.
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