NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


20 results for Development--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
17062
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the economy to the environment, education to infrastructure, North Carolina as a state is staggering. That is the verdict reached after a year-long effort by the Progress Board. Founded by the General Assembly in 1995, the Progress Board calls for long-range goals for the State.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Dan K. Moore organized a four day program for five regional programs to outline a holistic plan to accelerate the state's development. Six topics garnered the most attention: roads, agriculture, community planning, vocational/technical training, higher education, and financing these developments. Assigned to each of the five regions was a state official who addressed the Governor and on the state of each region and how each had unique requirements for future development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 9, June 1966, p5-8, il
Record #:
24340
Author(s):
Abstract:
After several years of depression-like conditions in commercial real-estate, North Carolina’s major markets are seeing declining vacancies and rising values and rents. This article presents various development companies in North Carolina and current projects in some of the state’s cities.
Record #:
24339
Author(s):
Abstract:
Robert L. Jones is one of North Carolina’s top developers who had to face significant debt after the real-estate market’s collapse. This article discusses the collapse and how Jones managed to keep his business afloat in the aftermath.
Record #:
24396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill’s anti-growth attitude has made life for developers difficult; politics and ordinances cause developers to pay exorbitant fees for their projects. Chapel Hill allows this because it is ultimately worried the poor and middle class will be priced out of the city should unchecked development take place.
Record #:
24409
Abstract:
The Binswanger Company, a development and real estate company, has been conducting business in North Carolina for years. This article discusses the success of the business and its plan for the future.
Record #:
24416
Abstract:
This article discusses whether too much development in North Carolina cities, such as Cary and Charlotte, is a danger, especially since many of the developers come from out-of-state.
Record #:
24449
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolinians are finding that the market is perfect for buying second homes and property in the state. This article discusses how developers and real estate businesses are using this to their advantage.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 11, April 1991, p31-33, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24664
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses specific accomplishments in North Carolina that led to development and growth in the tourism trade and overall economy of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 16, December 1957, p14-46, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24721
Author(s):
Abstract:
1951 proved to be the year of the most aggressive construction in North Carolina. This article presents the men who were responsible for spearheading various construction projects.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 31, December 1951, p16-23, il
Full Text:
Record #:
25631
Abstract:
Now that everyone knows the Triangle is a great place to live, how long will it last? With upcoming municipal elections in Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, and Carrboro focused on development, existing communities are feeling the heat of growth.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 18, Sept 27-Oct 10 1985, p1, 8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26991
Author(s):
Abstract:
Suburban sprawl has become a problem in the North Carolina Triangle. In order to keep the Triangle special and world-class, recommendations are to implement a point system for development, impact fees, size restrictions on shopping centers, park funds, sidewalks, tree ordinances, and traditional neighborhoods.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 22, Nov 17-30 1988, p5-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26998
Author(s):
Abstract:
A year-long study concluded in an effort to determine how to build the Triangle into a world-class region. The Triangle J Council of Governments gave recommendations for traffic, water protection, garbage accumulation, high phone rates, child-care shortages, uncoordinated planning and the need for better schools and a world trade center.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 24, Dec 16-Jan 11 1988, p5-6 Periodical Website
Record #:
27029
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the late 1990s, former Duke Basketball star Christian Laettner, his former teammate Brian Davis, and developer Tom Niemann formed Blue Devil Ventures, a company that converted properties into the West Village in downtown Durham. After several struggles with financial investments and lawsuits, the company failed and was sold to a Ohio firm.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28053
Author(s):
Abstract:
The problems with surrounding the Rolling Hills community in Durham are detailed. In the past 20 years, the city awarded public funds to two developers who failed to develop the neighborhood which overlooks downtown Durham. The city has foreclosed on the loans and all but five homes are boarded up. The city is looking to try for a third time to develop the property and believe its development will spur growth in the area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 40, October 2009, p5-7 Periodical Website