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46 results for Leutz, Jim
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Record #:
6968
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Leutze examines the dilemma facing residents of Carolina Beach -- whether to preserve the town's character or to allow an up-scale, out-of-town developer to build a mixed-use complex designed for residential and commercial use.
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7412
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At one time dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the North Carolina's inlets and Intracoastal Waterway was a year-round project to keep the navigable channels open for fishing and related businesses. Now Congress and the current federal administration are intent on getting out of the dredging business. Many legislators feel it is the job of the coastal states to keep their waterways clear. Efforts by North Carolina's U.S. Senators Dole and Burr, and Congressman Walter Jones to add more dredging money to the budget have been unsuccessful. Six of the state Congressional delegation did not support Dole, Burr, and Jones in their attempt to add more dredging money. Leutze outlines an approach to educate representatives within North Carolina and without on the importance of keeping these waterways cleared.
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7415
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Leutze discusses the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from colonial times to the present. Unnamed in earlier times, the waters were simply a pathway used by colonists, sailors, fishermen, and commercial interests. An influential 1808 report, “Public Roads and Canals,” by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury, called for a series of internal improvements to link states in the young nation together. In 1859, the first barge passed along the waterway. In 1913, Congress purchased land and began planning for a waterway from Norfolk, Virginia, to Beaufort, North Carolina. By 1936, the route was complete to the South Carolina line. Leutze concludes by describing towns and scenery along the route today.
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7416
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In part two of his series on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Leutze travels the northern section by car, making stops that include Elizabeth City, Coinjock, Engelhard, and Belhaven. He stresses the importance of the waterway for recreational and commercial use and points out the emergency created by a lack of federal funds to prevent the silting in of the inlets that give access to the sea.
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7423
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Leutze reports on the inaugural East Coast Waterways and Beach Symposium held at Emerald Isle in July 2005. Discussions were held on the most important developments along the coast and included dredging, beach nourishment, infrastructure needs, and the federal government's attitude toward coastal services.
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Record #:
7717
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Plans are underway to develop a mega seaport just above Southport. The port will be four times as large as Wilmington and rival Charleston, South Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia. The new port will handle two million containers a year and have space for four ships to dock at a four-thousand-foot structure. The North Carolina Ports Authority is negotiating for 600 acres of land to start the project, but the acreage is only the beginning. Land will be needed for roads, railroads, and storage facilities to support the port. On the downside is what might occur to the fragile eco-structure of the area. Although the port is years away, Leutze argues for taking a hard look at planning instead of taking the approach of “Let's build it and see what happens.”
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Record #:
8020
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In this article Leutze continues his examination of the project to develop a mega seaport just above Southport. The port will be four times as large as the current one at Wilmington and rival Charleston, South Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia. The new port will handle two million containers a year and have space for four ships to dock at a four-thousand-foot structure. He gives an in-depth look at the issues involving the planned super port. One issue is the needed cooperation between North and South Carolina, the two states that will be mightily affected by the international port.
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Record #:
8306
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Lutze discusses fish faming and its impact on coastal North Carolina.
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Record #:
8374
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Luetze discusses the decline in fish stocks worldwide. Almost a third of the fish stocks, as revealed in a four-year study of catch records, were 90 percent below the maximum historical catch level. Predictions are that by the mid-2000s the stocks will be practically nonexistent, affecting two hundred million people who fish for a living and one billion people who depend on fish as their primary food. He discusses the importance of renewing the Magnuson-Stevens Act of 1976, which established fishery councils to manage resources and fishing activities in the federal two-hundred-mile limit off the national coastline. Only in North Carolina's Southeastern Atlantic region has there been any progress is protecting and rebuilding fish stocks.
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Record #:
8555
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Along the North Carolina coast a hostile relationship exists between recreational and commercial fishermen. Each group for their own reasons fears the other and what they might do. Leutze discusses some of the perceptions the two groups have of each other. For example, commercial fishermen feel recreational ones are insufficiently regulated, while they have to deal with all kinds of rules, regulations, and quotas. Recreational fishermen think that commercial people are unconcerned about exploiting the fisheries. Leutze suggests airing these perceptions to reach a middle ground. For example, commercial fishermen do care about the fisheries because their livelihood depends on them.
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8554
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Leutze continues his series on coastal aquaculture by discussing two different, but successful, programs. One is a large-scale project at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. The program began in 1998 under the direction of Dr. Wade Watanabe, a research professor at UNCW's Center for Marine Science. Watanabe coordinates the center's aquaculture programs. The other program is smaller and was started by Jeff Wolfe, an enterprising local fisherman.
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Record #:
8711
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Leutze reports on the results of a two-year research project conducted at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington on the economic impact of the Intracoastal Waterway. The survey was aimed at recreational boaters from the Virginia to the South Carolina border.
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Record #:
9487
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The real estate boom along North Carolina's coasts is changing not only the tax evaluation there but also the very quality and character of life that brought people there in the first place. Leutze continues to prod officials and citizens to take action to save the coastline by increasing funds for land and water conservation and historic preservation. The price tag would cost $1 billion and is opposed by realtors, developers, and restaurant owners. Leutze discusses ways to raise the money.
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Record #:
9517
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Leutze discusses a collaborative research project, titled “Impacts of Global Warming on North Carolina's Coastal Economy,” which was conducted by scientists at UNC-Wilmington, Appalachian State, East Carolina University, and Duke. The counties studied were Bertie, Dare, Carteret, and New Hanover
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Record #:
10047
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In this second in a series of interviews with candidates for Governor of North Carolina, Leutze interviews Democrat Richard Moore and Republican Pat McCrory for their views on the future of the coastal region.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 2008, p28-29, por Periodical Website
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