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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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64 results for Environmental protection
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Record #:
261
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research released its latest book, THE GUIDE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, that includes listings and descriptions of private environmental organizations, other groups for which the environment is a secondary concern, and state government agencies responsible in part for environmental management.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Jan 1984, p44-49, il
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Record #:
772
Abstract:
Despite conventional wisdom to the contrary, research shows that North Carolinians are concerned about the environment and support strong environmental regulations.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Spring 1992, p15-20, il
Record #:
1071
Author(s):
Abstract:
Industry officials, activists, lawyers and lawmakers are grappling with the issue of environmental protection. They are seeking a common ground from which to approach the issue. Covered: state law vs. federal law in regard to compliance.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 5, May 1993, p14-24, il, por
Record #:
1422
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern Appalachian Mountain Initiative is a state-driven voluntary group created by eight southeastern states, including N.C. The organization seeks to foster a cooperative, non-regulatory approach to development and environmental protection.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p12-16, il
Record #:
1981
Abstract:
When environmental protection and economic interests clash, environmentalists, regulators, and developers have used negotiation as a means of settling disputes.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Oct 1994, p1,6-7, il
Record #:
2079
Author(s):
Abstract:
A partnership between such governmental agencies as the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation and private businesses like Carolina Power and Light Company is producing ways to protect the state's natural resources and environment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p21-25, il
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Record #:
2806
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences studies forces that affect the coastal environment - for example, whether nitrogen in the Neuse River comes from industrial or agricultural sources.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Dec 1995, p8-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3169
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina Trout Company is appealing the Tennessee Valley Authority's denial of their request to place commercial trout farms in public lakes, including Fontana. The authority believes that the farms could adversely affect the environment.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Winter 1997, p3,5, il
Record #:
3444
Abstract:
In 1983, the General Assembly passed legislation that allows credit against the state income tax for property donated for land and habitat conservation.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 4, Summer 1997, p28-37, il, f
Record #:
4031
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1998, when Bill Holman, a former environmental lobbyist, was named assistant secretary for environmental protection in the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, conservationists were delighted, and many business leaders were not. While a number of measures were passed in the 1998 General Assembly, including reducing nitrogen dumping in the Neuse River, time constraints of Holman's job limited action on other matters, like urban sprawl.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 4, Jan 1999, p13-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4639
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lundie Spence, a North Carolina Sea Grant education specialist, has been named a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Hero for 2000. The program recognizes heroes for their tireless efforts in preserving and protecting the country's environment. Spence has been with the Sea Grant program twenty-two years. Among her environmental efforts is Big Sweep in North Carolina, a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program is now in all 100 North Carolina counties.
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Record #:
4916
Abstract:
No one could foresee in 1989 the growth of population, construction, and economy in North Carolina by the year 2000. Such rapid growth, however, creates serious problems to air quality, water quality, and to the supply of drinking water, all of which can have an impact upon the state's ability to maintain its growth.
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Record #:
4976
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are fourteen coal-fired power plants in North Carolina, with Carolina Power and Light and Duke Power having seven each. Rules adopted in October 2000 require these plants to emit 69 percent less nitrogen oxide in five years than currently. The challenge in doing this is whether the aging plants can reduce ozone-causing gases and still keep the power flowing.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 2, Feb 2001, p18-19, 22-23, il
Record #:
5424
Abstract:
Legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly places the state in the forefront in the fight against air pollution. The law, popularly called the \"Clean Smokestacks Bill,\" requires power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from 245,000 tons in 1998 to 56,000 tons by 2009. Reductions in sulfur dioxide are also required. Power suppliers, including Duke Energy and Progress Energy, support the legislation.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 8, Aug 2002, p20
Record #:
5778
Abstract:
There are 4,000 miles of estuarine shoreline in the state. Over the past twenty years, homesites, construction, and farming have increased along it, prompting concern about water quality, wildlife habitats, and erosion. The Division of Coastal Management is reviewing building regulations of the past decades to determine if revising them would alleviate these problems.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1999, p24-27, il Periodical Website