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9 results for Estuarine area conservation
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Record #:
1120
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study (APES) is an intensive analysis of the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds with the goal of finding ways to manage these estuaries to conserve their valuable ecological functions.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Sept/Oct 1992, p8-10, por
Record #:
1552
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new phase of the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study is underway. The management phase's purpose is to act upon the information gathered over the past seven years, and to draft a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan based on this information.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p3, por
Record #:
18900
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article analyzes the use of the state's tidal environs and the loss of estuarine rich areas to land development. Arguments for retaining these natural environs for economic, natural, and fishing/tourist interests are presented to promote the conservation of these areas. The author also presents ideas for finding funding for such reclamation projects.
Source:
North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 15 Issue 6-7, June/July 1968, p22-25, il
Record #:
18898
Author(s):
Abstract:
Estuaries are areas where fresh water flowing towards the coast meets the oceans salt water and these natural havens account for 2,000,000 acres of the state's tidal area. The author presents an argument for the protection of these areas not only for natural splendor but contribution to the fishing industry -- a $100,000,000 industry for the state.
Source:
North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 15 Issue 6-7, June/July 1968, p17-21, il
Record #:
25003
Author(s):
Abstract:
The estuaries in North Carolina are in trouble. As pollution destroys this valuable resource, new ways must be found to save it. There has been some success with dredge spoil islands, and that approach may help preserve the estuaries.
Source:
Record #:
8316
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's estuarine region covers two million acres. Only Alaska and Louisiana have more extensive estuarine areas than North Carolina, and no state is destroying the productivity of its estuaries as rapidly as this state. In the past fifteen years, almost one-third of the state's prime coastal marshlands have been destroyed. Davis discusses why this area is important to the state's economy, how development is affecting it, and possible approaches to saving the area.
Full Text:
Record #:
941
Author(s):
Abstract:
A management plan released by the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study would restore the sickly Pamlico and Albemarle sounds.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27566
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dave Owens is the former director of the Division of Coastal Management. Owens helped create the Estuarine Sanctuary Program and pushed coastal-development regulation. Committed to protecting North Carolina’s coastal habitats and communities who depend on those habitats, Owens worked hard to resist pressure to weaken regulations for developers. He was forced out of his position and now works at UNC’s Institute for Government, but continues to be a role model for coastal management leaders.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p10 Periodical Website
Record #:
33298
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the House and Senate work to reauthorize the Clean Water Act, one of the amendments they will be considering is directed at maintaining water quality in estuaries. The Water Quality Renewal Act of 1985, contains an amendment put forth by North Carolina Representative Walter B. Jones to establish a program for maintaining estuarine water quality. The amendment gives special consideration to Albemarle Sound and Pamlico Bay in selecting estuaries of national significance.