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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Coastal erosion
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Record #:
16631
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With the worry of coastal erosion along North Carolina's coast, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission (CRC) has been discussing ocean setback rules and the use of sandbags.
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Record #:
19179
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Providing defense against the loss of beaches to erosion comes in many forms. In North Carolina there are strict rules concerning beach nourishment and the use of defense mechanism such as seawalls and bulkheads.
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Record #:
25006
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The water is getting dangerously close to the Cape Lookout lighthouse. With erosion increasing from 2.8 feet a month to 23.4 feet a month, it will not be long before the lighthouse is falling into the sea. While blame for this problem is being put on various causes, the big issue now is not who did it, but how the lighthouse will be saved.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, February 1979, p1-3, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
25002
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The coast is constantly changing. This is a problem when you have people living on it. However, new research is being conducted on marsh grass as a possible aid in preventing moving shorelines and dunes.
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Record #:
25007
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Now that the need to save the Cape Lookout lighthouse is recognized, the question is how? Various ideas have been put forward, from bank revetment to simply moving the lighthouse itself.
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Record #:
25063
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Kristen Rosenfeld is planting amaranth on beaches of Bird Island to help develop dunes. She is conducting a study on the unique dynamics of Bird Island.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2003, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34082
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Scientists at the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort claim that property owners in the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system who try to protect houses against erosion and sea level rise by installing bulkheads and dikes could eventually destroy the East Coast’s most important marine fisheries estuary. This article discusses wetlands, sea level rise, and the long-term impacts to North Carolina.