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30 results for North Carolina Architect
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Record #:
18904
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author proffers some responsible urban planning measures for both the near and distant futures. Keeping in mind both uses for public and private lands, the article explores potential solutions for a more urbanized and technological future while not losing the state's natural resources.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
18900
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article analyzes the use of the state's tidal environs and the loss of estuarine rich areas to land development. Arguments for retaining these natural environs for economic, natural, and fishing/tourist interests are presented to promote the conservation of these areas. The author also presents ideas for finding funding for such reclamation projects.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 15 Issue 6-7, June/July 1968, p22-25, il
Record #:
18906
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's botanical garden began as a 72 acre plot near Chapel Hill in 1952. By 1968, the garden grew into a 329 acre expanse including hard and softwood stands of forests. Its role is to supply a refuge for natural plants open to citizens and scholars alike.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 15 Issue 6-7, June/July 1968, p34-35, il
Record #:
18898
Author(s):
Abstract:
Estuaries are areas where fresh water flowing towards the coast meets the oceans salt water and these natural havens account for 2,000,000 acres of the state's tidal area. The author presents an argument for the protection of these areas not only for natural splendor but contribution to the fishing industry -- a $100,000,000 industry for the state.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 15 Issue 6-7, June/July 1968, p17-21, il
Record #:
18909
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Research Triangle, once fallow farmland, was transformed into a 5,000 acre scientific mecca. Lauded across the nation as a development success the research triangle encompasses some $50,000,000 worth of architecture and landscaped stretches which brought 6,500 new employment opportunities to central North Carolina.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 17 Issue 7-8, July-Aug 1970, p12-17, il
Record #:
18919
Author(s):
Abstract:
Having a balanced land use plan for the state's resources which offsets economic demands with environmental protection is the author's primary focus. Five areas are suggested as primary concerns as future development of state lands continue; districting, local control, taxation, shoreline protection, and regulations. Using Hawaii as a case study, the author proposes changes for the state legislature to manage and regulate further land developments with conservation a key component.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 19 Issue 1-2, Jan-Feb 1972, p12-17, il
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Record #:
18986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coastal development requires a balanced approach to both stimulate economic development while also preserving natural resources. In 1972, plans for development in Currituck County were halted to allow a team of architects, engineers, ecologists, economists, and local officials create a thorough, multi-disciplinary plan for the county's coastal land use. Specifics of their plan and potential use as a model for the entire state's coastal region are discussed.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 5; 6, May/June 1973, p7-22, il
Record #:
18979
Abstract:
The authors tackle the problem of businesses moving from city centers to larger strip-mall type shopping areas outside of downtowns, termed urban blight. Coupling retailers, restaurants, and services with green spaces and more attractive facades is one way to revive small town main streets. To exemplify this model, the authors highlight several cities and towns across the state which are successfully retaining and cultivating downtown spaces including: Tarboro, Edenton, and Washington.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 1&2, Jan-Feb 1973, p10-15, il
Record #:
18987
Author(s):
Abstract:
Town planning has a rich history within the state dating back to the colonial era and the article specifically describes the state's planned communities and associated developments. Beginning with Bath in 1704, the author focuses on European and especially German influences over town planning. Moving through the 19th and 20th century, places like Pinehurst and Biltmore village provide later examples of the state's cultivated communities.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 11; 12, Nov/Dec 1973, p16-21, il
Record #:
19035
Abstract:
Urban planning for Bull Durham began in 1865 with the need to develop the city's commercial center. More than a century later, the city was undergoing another downtown revitalization. This time emphasis shifted beyond just commercial ventures to creating an urban experience to draw people to the downtown area. Detailed plans show the history of Durham's different historic city revitalization programs throughout the 110 year timeline.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, May/June 1975, p8-21, il
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Record #:
19037
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Governor's Mansion on North Blount Street in Raleigh underwent some timely and very necessary renovations in 1975. Occupied since 1891, the home required improvements far beyond commonplace maintenance, most critical updating the electric. Work was supervised by members from the Mansion Fine Arts Committee, Department of Cultural Resources, and the governor's wife.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 22 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1975, p16-17, il
Record #:
19036
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh's first historic district was a central city district called Oakwood. In June of 1975, Raleigh City Council members zoned this area a historic district to protect the Victorian neighborhood. Declaring it a historic district rescued the oldest existing Raleigh neighborhood from a planned highway expansion.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, July/Aug 1975, p7-13, il
Record #:
19132
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article reviews two important pieces of legislation enacted by the 1974 General Assembly directly related to land-use. Both the Coastal Area Management Act and the Land Policy Act indicated legislatures were concerned with future development and protection of state lands. Projects proposed by the governor, legislature, or local governments were reviewed by the Land Policy Council, an organization formed to review all land-use projects through the lens of updated policies.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 23 Issue 3, May/June 1976, p12-16, il
Record #:
19133
Abstract:
A 71-acre plot encompassing the Stagville Plantation was donated to the state by the Liggett Group, Inc. of Durham in 1976. Historic structures and Native American artifacts prompted the state to organize the Stagville Center for Preservation Technology funded by the same group. The 1799 plantation home was converted into classroom and laboratory space to service statewide historic preservation projects.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 24 Issue 4, July/Aug 1977, p17, il
Record #:
19139
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accredited institutions and requirements to become a professional, recognized architect within the state are reviewed in this article. The North Carolina Board of Architecture functioning under the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards is the governing institution within the state and establishes the standards for practicing, professional architects. Specific requirements for professional status are reviewed.
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