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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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33 results for Architecture
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Record #:
4818
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Knight describes examples of North Carolina's distinctive architecture, including Asheville's Biltmore Estate, grand, showy 19th-century courthouses, the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, the Zebulon Vance Monument in Asheville, and an 85-foot- tall \"highboy\" in High Point.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p130-133, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6021
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To mark their 50th anniversary in 1989, North Carolina Preservation commissioned architectural historian Catherine W. Bishir of Raleigh and architectural photographer Tim Buchman of Charlotte to collaborate on a new architectural history of North Carolina. Bishir discusses the creation of the book in this PRESERVATION interview.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 71, Spring 1988, p1-4, 7, il
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Record #:
11577
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The Raleigh-based design firm, Synergetics, creates prototypes for lightweight structures. Working under contract with geodesic dome designer, Buckminister Fuller, the firm has designed buildings for the U.S. Marine Corps as well as the 1959, 1962, and 1964 World's Fairs. Owner, James W. Fitzgibbon, previously taught at the North Carolina State School of Design. Other members of the Synergetics team include Bill Ballenger, Dale Blosser, Jim Quinn, Levette Teague, Pete Barnwell, and T. C. Howard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 2, June 1964, p9-10, por
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Record #:
14893
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Buck Creek mansion belonged to and was built by Colonel John Carson in 1770. Located in McDowell County three miles west of Marion, the mansion served as private residence for Carson and his heirs and later as an inn. The colonial estate exhibits Jacobean features of early American architecture including pedimented gables and large end chimneys.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 17, Sept 1943, p4, 27, il
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Record #:
16531
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The American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter's (AIA NC) new Center for Architecture and Design opens in downtown Wilmington.
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Record #:
16589
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On a sloping triangular-shaped lot at the intersection of downtown Raleigh's Peace and Wilmington streets, a building of statewide significance is rising. The new North Carolina Center for Architecture and Design, a multipurpose facility of the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter (AIA NC), is an intimately scaled 12,000-square-foot structure on a half-acre lot that can accommodate parking. Ground was broken in early December 2009, with completion scheduled for October 2011 to host the organization's annual design conference.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Apr 2011, p17-19, 21-23 Periodical Website
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Record #:
19136
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The author looks at Asheville's urban architecture, specifically how the financial booms of the 1890s and 1920s were formative to the cityscape. Woven throughout the article is a brief history of American architecture through specific buildings in Asheville. Preservation and protection of these structures is also briefly discussed.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
21262
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A look at the architectural career of A.G. (Adolphus Gustavus) Bauer in North Carolina spanning the years between 1883 and 1898. Enjoying the patronage of the state government, Bauer designed a group of structures that constitutes a significant contribution to North Carolina's institutional and civic architecture.
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Record #:
24093
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Asheville's Pack Square is a treasure trove of architectural styles but the Jackson building draws the most gazes. Lynwood B. Jackson commissioned the building in the 1920s in order to create an icon with which to advertise his business ventures.
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Record #:
27313
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Asheville’s Flatiron Building is a unique example of architecture and the neoclassical style designed in 1926 by Albert C. Wirth.
Record #:
27631
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William Buckland is known for his architectural carving work in Richmond County, Virginia, but evidence of his work in Maryland has been questioned. Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina reassessed Buckland’s career from 1771-1774 through a comparative study of six houses, two documented and four previously attributed to his shop.
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Record #:
27630
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the carving work of William Buckland and William Bernard Sears. Their carving represents some of the most important American interior architecture of the Rococo period.
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Record #:
27650
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Raleigh’s historic neighborhood Oakwood has been in the national spotlight over the past few years. A walking tour of the neighborhood by the American Institute of Architects offers a way of understanding what makes the neighborhood special. The North Carolina Victorian, the Second Empire, the Queen Anne, Neoclassical revival, Craftsman, and even modernist styles are all represented. Some of the history of the neighborhood and its architecture are explored by the author on one such tour.
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Record #:
27698
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study on the Page family and their eighteenth-century mansion in Gloucester County, Virginia known as Rosewell. The house construction and architecture proclaimed its occupants to be powerful, educated and wealthy, but in less than three generations, the Page family suffered drastic economic decline.
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Record #:
27697
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of the work attributable to the anonymous artisan identified as Humphrey Sommers’ carver. Sommers’ high social status in late colonial Charleston, South Carolina is evident in the Rococo interior architecture and stylistic work of his personal estates.
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