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16 results for Urban development
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Record #:
15998
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Abstract:
This article examines how cities regulate downtown urban design and the effect of these approaches in shaping the built environment. The lack of urban design controls for building placement, elevations and other features can open the door for new development to be designed to accommodate the automobile at the expense of the pedestrian. This article also looks at several cities to show how design standards and guidelines have raised the bar for downtown development, affecting the design of not only buildings but also streetscape improvements and public spaces.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p3-20, bibl, f
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Record #:
17132
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N.C. State has expanded student housing into an area near the neighborhood of Stanhope in Raleigh. The large housing complex is incongruous with a housing plan created by community members in 1999. Stanhope denizens originally planned to integrate student housing with members of the community to create a \"urban village\" with more diverse housing options and locally owned businesses but instead the university has erected large dorm-like housing for the growing student population.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 31, Aug 2012, p7, 9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17379
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Greenfire Development, the group which just sold Durham's Suntrust Bank tower, is being sued by four tenants. The tenants rented studio space in the Liberty Warehouse, a renovated tobacco warehouse. Dispute between tenants and the company arose over a collapsed roof after heavy rains in March 2011.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 36, Sept 2012, p5, 17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17450
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Although there is no question that North Carolina's Housing Authorities Law enables municipalities to establish and operate housing authorities in the field of low-rent housing, it is doubtful whether this law authorizes condemnation of slums to be sold for redevelopment.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Nov 1949, p9-10, Inside Back Cover
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Record #:
17637
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Abstract:
Extraterritorial spending refers to the ability for a city to expand beyond its borders by purchasing extra lands. With growing urban populations, cities must expand out to provide appropriate services like water treatment and public parks. Extraterritorial power was with the legislature and in some instances with the cities specifically.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 9, June 1961, p5-6, 14
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Record #:
17636
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Abstract:
Six major metropolitan areas are analyzed to track changes in economic development for both manufacturers and personal households. Data from the 1960 United States Census and 1958 Census of Manufacturers are tabulated for Asheville, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 9, June 1961, p1-3, il
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Record #:
17641
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Abstract:
Ahoskie began an aggressive urban development program in 1959. City planners emphasized the role of downtown as the heart of community and economic progress. Modernizing the central business district spelled success for downtown Ahoskie in the mid-20th-century.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Dec 1961, p4-6, il
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Record #:
17658
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Abstract:
Civic development focused on downtown spaces was a focal point for local officials in the mid 20th century. Interest grew after the Institute of Government hosted a Central Business District Seminar Series in the spring of 1961. Fourteen cities (Ahoskie, Asheville, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, Laurinburg, Mooresville, Raleigh, Rockingham, Salisbury, Selma, and Winston-Salem) reported on efforts to increase business and tourism along their respective city centers.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 28 Issue 7, May 1962, p6-13, il
Record #:
18904
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The author proffers some responsible urban planning measures for both the near and distant futures. Keeping in mind both uses for public and private lands, the article explores potential solutions for a more urbanized and technological future while not losing the state's natural resources.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
23235
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Abstract:
Carrboro's The Arts Center and music venue Cat's Cradle are at risk of being pushed out because they are located on a valuable piece of property in which hotel developers are highly interested.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 5, February 2015, p25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23763
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Madison, Yancey, and Mitchell counties deal with growth and consequences as a result of increased development to make a large swath of Western North Carolina more accessible.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
24329
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This article discusses how urban centers in North Carolina generated the most growth over the years. To analyze economic health in the state, North Carolina was separated into eighteen regions with population and city expansion examined as growth indicators.
Record #:
28578
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After several false starts, North Carolina’s most famous tobacco town, Winston-Salem, shows signs of rebirth. Winston-Salem is transforming into an apex of biomedical research, education and technology with the help of Wake Forest University and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and School of Medicine.
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Record #:
29138
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A major issues with Charlotte, North Carolina's urban transformation is the availability of affordable housing, particularly for those who help make the city's expansion possible. Amongst the skyscrapers and restaurants, city planners estimate that Charlotte needs more than 34,000 additional affordable housing units to meet current demand. The city is making various attempts to to address the problem, with varied success.
Record #:
31212
Abstract:
The authors consider various issues of equity regarding the distribution of public services and payments in growing areas. This study looks at the distributive equality of the services' cost and benefits among the local citizens surrounding the Research Triangle Park, and the possible overflows into other surrounding communities.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall 1981, p38-47, bibl
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