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31 results for Research Triangle Park
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Record #:
374
Abstract:
Wake County city and county planners address planning logistics for an expected boom in industry at Research Triangle Park.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Sept 1981, p39-42, il, por
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Record #:
594
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Abstract:
Research Triangle Park has become one of the world's finest research areas in a variety of fields.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 6, June 1990, p26-37, il
Record #:
626
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The reputation of North Carolina - especially Research Triangle Park - as a hotbed of medical research continues to grow, as an infusion of grants propels breakthroughs in cancer treatment, AIDS, and other diseases.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Nov 1991, p25-31, il
Record #:
646
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Taylor stresses the importance of the Governor's mansion in North Carolina history and in the development of Research Triangle Park.
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Record #:
1232
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Jim Roberson is the president and CEO of Research Triangle Foundation and chief marketer for Research Triangle Park.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Oct 1993, p8-11, por
Record #:
2087
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Abstract:
Building sites are few on the Durham side of Research Triangle Park, while Wake County's portion begins to develop and expand. However, the Durham side is vital, with personnel relocations and new businesses moving into existing buildings.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 1, Jan 1995, p12-13, il
Record #:
9279
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Abstract:
On February 26, 1979, the last total solar eclipse until 2017 will be seen in North America. North Carolinians will only get to view a partial eclipse in 1979, during which the sun will be between 55% and 60% covered by the moon. Viewing times range from 11 a.m. to 1:25 p.m. depending on in what part of the state you are.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Jan 1979, p21-22, il, map
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Record #:
10372
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Abstract:
Shea discusses the background and development of the Research Triangle Park, which is located in Wake and Durham Counties. He discusses the park's research potential, the establishment of the park, land acquisition, construction underway, and plans for the future.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 17 Issue 6, Nov 1959, p149-152, il, map
Record #:
10388
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Abstract:
Stewart provides an update of progress in the Research Triangle Park during the past year. Laboratories have been constructed; Chemstrand was the first company to move in; roads have been built; and utilities have been installed. Stewart includes information on future occupants of the park.
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Record #:
10384
Abstract:
Chemstrand Research Center, Inc. is the first occupant of the Research Triangle Park and is primarily engaged in polymer research. Dr. D. W. Chaney is the executive director of the center.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 18 Issue 6, Nov 1960, p80-81, il, por
Record #:
14044
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Abstract:
The Research Triangle Park will celebrate its twenty-fifth anniversary on January 9, 1984. It is the largest planned research park in the world and is regularly compared to California's Silicon Valley. Currently the park has forty-five tenants that employ over 22,500 people with a payroll of $600 million.
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Record #:
18909
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Abstract:
The Research Triangle, once fallow farmland, was transformed into a 5,000 acre scientific mecca. Lauded across the nation as a development success the research triangle encompasses some $50,000,000 worth of architecture and landscaped stretches which brought 6,500 new employment opportunities to central North Carolina.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 17 Issue 7-8, July-Aug 1970, p12-17, il
Record #:
19224
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The article addresses the problems faced by the Research Triangle Park in the 1980s. First conceptualized as a space for only research and research manufacturing, initial zoning laws limited the growth and development within this area. Modern city planners from the North Carolina State University architecture department are studying the legislative and physical impediments for modernizing the Research Triangle Park.
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North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 30 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1982, p5-9, il
Record #:
19515
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Abstract:
The Research Triangle Park houses over 40,000 employees in 25 million square feet of facilities that drive the region of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Today, the RTP is re-imagining the famous research campus in reaction to modern trends in cooperation and open research.
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Record #:
24133
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Abstract:
RTI International is housed in a research park between Raleigh and Durham and works to study DNA, environmental issues, and obesity. The author discusses the current president and CEO of Research Triangle Institute, Wayne Holden, and presents what the CEO has to offer the Institute.
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