NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Medicine--Research
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
626
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reputation of North Carolina - especially Research Triangle Park - as a hotbed of medical research continues to grow, as an infusion of grants propels breakthroughs in cancer treatment, AIDS, and other diseases.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Nov 1991, p25-31, il
Record #:
1073
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Duke Children's Classic, in its 20th year, uses an annual celebrity golf and tennis tournament to raise money for research into children's health problems and for the staffing of positions in this area.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 5, May 1993, p52-54, por
Record #:
14403
Author(s):
Abstract:
One out of every five adult in the United States has either high blood pressure or hardening of the arteries. Previously prospects for relieving these conditions were slight because little was known about the cause. But today a group of American authorities on circulatory disease see hope for the future.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 15, Sept 1947, p11
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Andrew Weil spoke in Asheville at the annual Partnering Western Medicine and Integrative Healthcare Conference. Weil focused on bridging the gap between conventional and alternative health professionals.
Record #:
24370
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Charlotte infertility clinic, the Center for Reproductive Medicine, ran into trouble after mismanaging their money. Such medical facilities are still are still primarily businesses that need to demonstrate good management skills in order to achieve success.
Record #:
25033
Author(s):
Abstract:
Horseshoe crabs have a very unique quality in their blood. This quality may allow scientists to cure any number of diseases. As it is, the blood of a horseshoe crab is used to test medicines and vaccines before they are sold.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 5, May 1990, p3-4, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25034
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharks seem to have a unique quality in their cartilage proteins which inhibits the growth of tumors. Research is currently being done to discover if this could be a possible solution to cancer.
Source:
Record #:
25032
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many possible uses for creatures and materials found under the sea. These materials could mean great strides in medical advances.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 5, May 1990, p1-2, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25502
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC medicinal chemist Jian Jin created a molecular probe which may help to develop more effective treatments for cocaine addiction, mental retardation, HIV, and various types of cancer. The probe is freely available to the scientific community so that others may improve or expand upon the research.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 2, Winter 2012, p24-26, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25552
Author(s):
Abstract:
J. Victor Garcia-Martinez and his lab at UNC transplanted human cells into mice to study diseases particular to humans. Their human-mouse model is the first of its kind and has enabled new possibilities for AIDS research. The Garcia-Martinez lab used the model to find that the Truvada drug can prevent HIV transmission.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25691
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University researchers have developed a new drug that aids in the prevention of asthma attacks. The new drug prevents both inflammation and muscle contracting, while also being long acting.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
8292
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists world-wide are continually searching for ways to fight diseases. Some of the most important work in that fight was carried on in the late 20th-century in North Carolina by Gertrude Elion and George Hitching. In 1988, they shared the Nobel Prize in medicine with England's Sir James Black. Their revolutionary discoveries led to drugs to fight leukemia, malaria, gout, organ rejection, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain bacterial infections, and laid the foundation for work leading to AZT, the first treatment for AIDS.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p10-12, il, por