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34 results for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--Medical schools
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Record #:
13568
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The University of North Carolina has resumed offering M.D. degrees for the first time since 1910.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 18, Oct 1952, p9, il
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Record #:
24581
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Dr. Ben Wilcox and his team of heart surgeons at UNC Medical Center at Chapel Hill have successfully completed multiple heart bypass surgeries, revitalizing people who have been crippled by heart disease.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 11, November 1971, p17-19, 31, il
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Record #:
25491
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Medical researchers at UNC Chapel Hill are pursuing new methods to treat diseases more quickly and efficiently. To speed up the approval process of new drugs, UNC researchers advise scientists to collaborate, communicate the implications of their work, and be open to entrepreneurial thinking.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25534
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At the UNC Microbiome Core Facility, researchers have found that our intestines are full of known and unknown species that compose unique bacterial ecologies. UNC researchers share their findings on the role of bacteria in several ailments, including colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and colon cancer. They are discovering that probiotics begin to help our health when we are babies.
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25535
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UNC researcher Carol Otey discovered the protein palladin in 1991. Otey and Teri Brenthall of the University of Washington found palladin to be the source of a genetic mutation in pancreatic cancer. Siince this discovery, Otey and UNC pancreatic researcher H.J. Kim have found nine additional forms of palladin. They believe palladin acts as a protective barrier around tumors to resist chemotheraphy drugs.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25533
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The Ramphal Cardiac Surgery simulator was designed by Paul Ramphal at the University of the West Indies, and built in Chapel Hill with the help of Richard Feins, UNC professor of surgery. The simulator uses pig parts arranged like they would be in a human, and is used to train medical residents.
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Record #:
25552
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J. Victor Garcia-Martinez and his lab at UNC transplanted human cells into mice to study diseases particular to humans. Their human-mouse model is the first of its kind and has enabled new possibilities for AIDS research. The Garcia-Martinez lab used the model to find that the Truvada drug can prevent HIV transmission.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25550
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Martin Kohlmeier and Kelly Adams run UNC’s Nutrition in Medicine program and believe physicians should have a good understanding of nutrition. Their mission is to integrate nutrition education at medical schools and to provide an online curriculum to help medical students, residents, and doctors get the nutrition coursework they need.
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Record #:
25548
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Professor of emergency medicine Laurence Katz started UNC’s hypothermia program in 2007, and recently formed Hibernaid, a company dedicated to creating new drugs for therapeutic hypothermia. Katz hopes to expand hypothermia programs and research to other hospitals.
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Record #:
25560
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Klaus Hahn and his UNC pharmacology lab discoveredthe genetic code to make a protein that responds to light. The protein stimulates cell movement, which is a technique with the potential to repair nerve injuries, create new muscle and bone, or understand how an embryo develops.
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Record #:
25556
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James Faber is a professor in the Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology. His lab is studying how risk for vascular disease depends on the number of collateral blood vessels a person has. So far, Faber’s lab has identified two genes that trigger collateral formation.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p30-32, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25657
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Ben Philpot, an assistant professor in the UNC Neuroscience Center, studies Angelman syndrome and its neurological symptoms. The most prominent symptom of Angelman syndrome is impaired speech. Philpot hopes to identify molecular changes that cause damage to the brain’s sensory experience.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25669
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The Khmer Rouge was a radical communist group who wiped out nearly a quarter of Cambodia’s population in the late 1970s. UNC researcher, Jeffrey Sonis, is studying the remaining Khmer Rouge leaders and Cambodians testifying about the executions, forced labor, torture and rapes. His research focuses on their mental health and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Record #:
25667
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UNC researchers have been researching HIV prevention and treatment, sexually transmitted disease management, and malaria vaccine development in Lilongwe, Malawi. They are using spatial-epidemiology data in vaccine trials to study communities vulnerable to mosquitos with malaria and to determine their response to treatments.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25668
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UNC chemists aim to decode the genome of HIV, a RNA-based virus, to model its genetic structure. They hope to decode different stages of the HIV structure and then make a movie of how it looks over its replication cycle. This could provide insight to new ideas for therapies and targeted responses to HIV and AIDS.
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