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15 results for Genetics--Research
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Record #:
2535
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Abstract:
In 1954, Oliver Smithies made one of the most important discoveries in molecular genetics. Forty years of research later, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor is still at the top of his field.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, July 1995, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25381
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With disease spreading through the Christmas tree industry in Western North Carolina and a need for a new cash crop in the Eastern part of the state, researchers are working on developing a genetically modified version of the trees to benefit all growers in North Carolina.
Record #:
25560
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Klaus Hahn and his UNC pharmacology lab discoveredthe genetic code to make a protein that responds to light. The protein stimulates cell movement, which is a technique with the potential to repair nerve injuries, create new muscle and bone, or understand how an embryo develops.
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Record #:
25556
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James Faber is a professor in the Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology. His lab is studying how risk for vascular disease depends on the number of collateral blood vessels a person has. So far, Faber’s lab has identified two genes that trigger collateral formation.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p30-32, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25664
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Daniel Pomp, a UNC professor of genetics, is renowned for research on animal and obesity genetics. Pomp investigates exercise, a powerful trait potentially capable of controlling and preventing obesity. Experiments on running mice show that they have an increased ability to exercise, but behavioral and brain studies show that they’re also more motivated to run.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p38-40, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25782
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Scientists commonly use fruit flies to study how human bodies work. At UNC, biologists are using them to study genes involved in DNA repair pathways, scent perceptions, food preferences, and human health.
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Record #:
25803
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Fernando Pardo-Manuel de Villena and his colleagues discovered that the most common types of lab mice studied today represent only a fraction of the genetic diversity found in mouse populations. This could be problematic because many diseases require the ability to study complex and diverse DNA sequences.
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Record #:
25919
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UNC researchers completed the first study to link a genetic variation with a chronic pain disorder. They found that women who had tiny variations in the COMT gene were more sensitive to pain then men.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Spring 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26122
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Carolina researchers are working on gene therapy to treat cystic fibrosis and hemophilia B. Richard Boucher and Jude Samulski have been working on a virus to transfer genes and replace damaged DNA. Recently, they successfully repaired the genes of a hemophilic dog and are planning human trials within the next two years.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p10-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28384
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Fast Technology for Analysis of nucleic acids (FTA) cards are embedded with special chemicals that inhibit degradation of DNA. The FTA card system was tested on marine green and red algae collected in New Hanover County, North Carolina. Overall, the use of FTA cards to preserve marine algal DNA is promising.
Record #:
30082
Abstract:
All salamander species of the genus Necturus are found throughout North Carolina and the coastal plain of southeastern United States. This study examined the degree to which chromosome changes have accompanied diversification and divergence within Necturus, and to elucidate the relationship between the geographic distribution and the evolutionary history of this group of salamanders.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p37-52, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
36559
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Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.
Record #:
36263
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC system research and startup businesses generated over 2.6 billion dollars and created over 28,000 jobs. Also yielded were medical advancements such as gene therapy, businesses like GI Therapeutics, Inc., and protective measures of the state’s ecosystems aimed to improve oyster growth.
Record #:
36274
Abstract:
Medical advancements possible over the next decade included cryopreservation, controlling prosthetic limbs with the mind, and nanotechnology. Areas projected for improvement or further development over the next ten years included gene therapy, noninvasive technology, and cure of Dementia diseases. As for an area the author acknowledges is not clear, it involves medical ethics: when to cease providing procedures, especially where age is concerned.
Record #:
36295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reported as among the top ten research universities in the United States, UNC Chapel Hill’s research endeavors has greatly impacted treatment measures for diseases such as cancer, postpartum depression, and diabetes. Such accomplishments possible through partnerships with corporations, as well as personalized treatments and targeted therapies.