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16 results for Hardy, Susan
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25497
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Steve Wing is an associate professor of epidemiology at UNC. Since 1995, Wing has been studying hog farming communities, waste management and its environmental effects. An important focus of his research is the proximity of hog waste lagoons to drinking water and residential areas. His research suggests that hog farming is linked to pollution and local health issues.
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25492
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Bernie Herman is a UNC professor of American Studies and native of Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Herman has expanded food tourism in Northampton County, Virginia to include Chapel Hill by bringing oysters and sweet potatoes. Herman’s goal is to document food culture and to explore local identities, while sharing distinctive recipes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p12-15, il Periodical Website
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25533
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The Ramphal Cardiac Surgery simulator was designed by Paul Ramphal at the University of the West Indies, and built in Chapel Hill with the help of Richard Feins, UNC professor of surgery. The simulator uses pig parts arranged like they would be in a human, and is used to train medical residents.
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25539
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Jay Smith, a UNC professor of history, has been studying the Beast of the Gévaudan. The French have argued about the identity of the eighteenth-century creature that killed more than a hundred people in the southern countryside. Smith suggests that the creature was a wolf, but hunters perpetuated the idea that it was a mythological creature to explain his failures out of fear of shame.
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25543
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UNC researchers Mark Norris and Sheila Kannappan are analyzing the Hubble Space Telescope archives to compare the ages of dwarfs and their host galaxies. If they are both of the same age, then the dwarfs are probably giant globular clusters; if they are of different ages, then the dwarf was probably born as a galaxy and later pulled into another orbit.
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25540
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UNC researchers are finding out why the death penalty debate, whether right or wrong, is fading away. According to political scientist Frank Baumgartner, media framing has a strong effect on juries and public opinion of the death penalty. The idea of innocent people getting executed is a dominant discussion point nationwide.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Spring 2011, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25560
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Klaus Hahn and his UNC pharmacology lab discoveredthe genetic code to make a protein that responds to light. The protein stimulates cell movement, which is a technique with the potential to repair nerve injuries, create new muscle and bone, or understand how an embryo develops.
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Record #:
25557
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UNC mathematics professor Peter Mucha studies networks in attempt to quantify relationships between nodes. Mucha has used network analysis to study connections in Congress, currency exchange rates, and the Bowl Championship Series.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p33-35, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25659
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Ty Hendrick, a UNC assistant professor of biology, studies flight principles based on birds and hawkmoths. Hendrick and his lab are specifically interested in understanding how animals use their wings to turn around when they are upright in the air.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p21-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25668
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UNC chemists aim to decode the genome of HIV, a RNA-based virus, to model its genetic structure. They hope to decode different stages of the HIV structure and then make a movie of how it looks over its replication cycle. This could provide insight to new ideas for therapies and targeted responses to HIV and AIDS.
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Record #:
25677
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UNC professor Jordynn Jack studied the ethics and scientific rhetoric used by mea and women working on the Manhattan Project. Jack found there was a difference between some of the scientists who seemed to be good at persuading and others who were not. Scientists who argued in terms of safety were less effective than those who argued in terms of what would move the project forward.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25679
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Lara Wagner is the first seismologist to use broadband seismometers in the Appalachian Mountains to explore the structure of the lithosphere. Her findings show that the crust underneath the Appalachians is thick, and indicate the mountains are not eroding nearly as fast as scientists have thought.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25719
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For kids with visual impairment or other disabilities, video games can seem out of reach. But now UNC computer scientists and their students are giving more kids a chance to play by designing Nintendo Wii games that incorporate a physical dimension.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p12-14, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25731
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Archaeologist Brian Billman led about two dozen UNC and Duke students to a small village in the Moche Valley of northern Peru to build a new water system for the community. The villagers were hired to help manage the project and complete construction.
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25737
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Anna Spagnoli’s research in pediatric endocrinology might lead to a new treatment for nonhealing broken bones known as fracture nonunions. She anticipates that stem cell treatments can help to regenerate bone tissue in children.
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