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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Nutrition
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Record #:
22043
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Abstract:
Food insecurity is rising in the state. The term refers to a household's inability to have food for an active healthy life at some time, but not all of the time because decisions must be made between paying house and medical bills balanced against buying good food. Since 2000, one in five North Carolinians have been in this category at one time or another. Such numbers rank the state sixth among the country's most food-insecure states at 19.3 percent.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 3, Jan 2014, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24754
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School lunches are an important part of primary and secondary education in North Carolina and throughout the country. This article describes the history of school lunches in the United States at large and North Carolina specifically.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 1, Fall 2015, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
25550
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Abstract:
Martin Kohlmeier and Kelly Adams run UNC’s Nutrition in Medicine program and believe physicians should have a good understanding of nutrition. Their mission is to integrate nutrition education at medical schools and to provide an online curriculum to help medical students, residents, and doctors get the nutrition coursework they need.
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Record #:
25710
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Dr. Walter Pories, a founding chairman of the East Carolina School of Medicine’s Department of Surgery, is being honored with the UNC Board of Governors highest honor, the O. Max Gardner Award for his innovations in animal nutrition and the treatment of obesity and diabetes with the gastric bypass surgical method.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25917
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Abstract:
UNC nutrition researchers provided a list of ten things you can do every day to eat better, feel better, and improve your health. Overall, their advice is to eat controlled portions of balanced healthy foods, stay hydrated, and be active.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Spring 2005, p16-22, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26092
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Abstract:
Nutrition researchers started PRAISE, a nutrition intervention program aimed at minorities. African Americans suffer certain cancers and diet-related diseases at higher rates than the general population. Churches in eight North Carolina counties participate in PRAISE, emphasizing healthy eating habits and recipes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26090
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Minnie Holmes-McNary, a molecular nutritionist, teamed up with biologist Albert Baldwin to research how diet affects gene expression. They found that Res, a molecular compound abundant in red grapes and wine, has both anticancer and anti-inflammatory potential.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26244
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Dr. Nancy Milio, professor of nursing and professor health policy, spent a month interviewing Norwegian officials as a basis for an analysis of the success of a comprehensive government farm-food-nutrition policy. The policy brings food supply into line with a national dietary pattern, and could be successful in the United States.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Winter 1989, p14-15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27305
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historically, bone broth was made to fight sickness. In addition to boosting the immune system, bone broth is credited with improving digestion and helping those with arthritis.
Record #:
28671
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s farmers markets are growing, to the benefit of local communities. North Carolina has the 10th most farmers’ markets per state in the country with over 250 local markets. The markets often fill a basic need for fresh produce, provide a connection to safer, healthier, locally sourced food, and have encouraged the growth of small farms. The markets also provide the benefit of increasing a sense of community in a town.
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Record #:
29466
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Women are encouraged to take a daily multivitamin containing folic acid or consider alternative dietary options in order to decrease pregnancy risks. This study examined the willingness of Latino women living in North Carolina to use these options.
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SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 141, Apr 2004, p1-8, bibl, f
Record #:
29536
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent Public Health Statistics Branch study suggests that occupational distribution contributes to the explanation of death from acute myocardial infarction, lung cancer, and prostatic cancer. Dietary and nutrition factors were determined to be affecting mortality among residents in North Carolina.
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PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 4, May 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29844
Abstract:
Nutritionists in Asheville, North Carolina are teaching people how to forage for edible foods in the wild. Wild Abundance, a wild food, homesteading and primitive skills school, says better nutrition comes from eating wild produce, mushrooms, plants and weeds. The process of foraging develops independence and increases flexibility and variety.
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Record #:
32172
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Abstract:
The State Board of Health conducted a nutrition survey to assess the extent of hunger problems in North Carolina, and to determine the barriers preventing good diet. The survey revealed that poor nutrition occurs most frequently in the eastern part of the state. Children in affluent and poor families alike are not eating what they should and may be malnourished.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 10, Oct 1971, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
36560
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering better healthcare outcomes is often a byproduct of diet, accounting for the food source itself and its source. Meats touted as nutritious and delicious include bison and elk. Benefits of these meats noted by King are lower cholesterol content and higher levels of protein and iron. As for environmental factors that impact produce and meat quality, the author recommended preserving topsoil and balancing the soil ecosystem. Such actions can yield healthy carbon levels and grasses for animals that positively impact their nutrient output.