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38 results for East Carolina University. Brody School of Medicine
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Record #:
123
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bracey Robertson is earning her Doctor of Medicine degree through a unique program, the Three Plus Three Program, offered by East Carolina University's Medical School wherein twelve months are trimmed off the traditional M.D. Program.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Mar 1992, p76-81, por
Record #:
3312
Abstract:
East Carolina University School of Medicine physicians Nicholas A. Patrone and Richard A. Hoppman practice music medicine. Their clinic provides help for performing artists just as sports medicine helps athletes recover.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Sept 1989, p36-37, il
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Record #:
5419
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Abstract:
East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine \"has pioneered and developed some of the most cutting-edge technology in the medical community,\" including robotic heart surgery and telemedicine. Stains discusses researchers and their work at the Brody School of Medicine.
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Record #:
5858
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Abstract:
Dr. Wallace R. Wooles, Dean of the East Carolina University School of Medicine, describes what a medical school really is, what makes it tick, and what its components are.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1973, p18-19, il
Record #:
8432
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University opened in 1977. Its mission is to train North Carolina residents to become family doctors in the eastern section of the state. When the medical school opened, fewer than 800 family doctors practiced east of I-95. Tyrrell County did not have a doctor, and Camden County had only one. Today there are over 1,600 primary care physicians practicing in the east. Over one-fourth of them are Brody graduates. Row discusses the work of some of the doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals that the Brody School graduates who are improving the lives of small-town families.
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Record #:
8607
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the spring of 1977, after twelve years of planning and preliminary accreditations, East Carolina University was approved for the enrollment of its first four-year medical class. Approval was granted by the joint accrediting agency of the American Medical Association and the Association of American Medical Colleges. The first class of twenty-eight students will begin on the Greenville campus in August 1977. The curriculum will emphasize family practice. Dr. William E. Laupus is the dean of the East Carolina University School of Medicine.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 7, July 1977, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
11111
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1971, the North Carolina General Assembly authorized a one-year medical program at East Carolina University. Dr. Wallace R. Wooles, Dean of the East Carolina University School of Medicine, presents the case for expanding the school to a two-year program.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 6, June 1972, p29-30, 46-47, il, por
Record #:
11381
Abstract:
A ten-year battle for a medical school at East Carolina University is about over. Early indications are that the University is going to win the fight against what at the beginning must have seemed overwhelming odds.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Feb 1975, p34-35, 43-44, il, por
Record #:
11472
Abstract:
This article recounts the efforts of East Carolina University and Chancellor Leo Jenkins to establish a school of medicine.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p35-37, 48-49, il, por
Record #:
12425
Abstract:
The East Carolina University Medical School is now in its eighth year of operation. Hedrick provides an update on the school's progress.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 43 Issue 9, Sept 1985, p28, 30, 48, il
Record #:
17053
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine has come a long way in a short time. It is one of the ten \"youngest\" medical school sin the country, but in a short time it has become the focal point for many advanced therapies and treatments that are drawing doctors from around the nation and the world to Greenville, North Carolina for training.
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Record #:
18157
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1973 North Carolina General Assembly session proved to be fruitful in passing much-needed health laws in the state. Major questions addressed were septic-tank regulation, abortion, immunization requirements, emergency medical services, and a study on East Carolina University's proposed medical school.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue 8, May 1973, p30-36, f
Record #:
24170
Author(s):
Abstract:
W. Randolf Chitwood, Jr. is a cardiothoracic surgeon who many believe is the best when it comes to using highly technical equipment to conduct various heart surgeries. The author discusses his experience having heart surgery and how Greenville, North Carolina became an important medical research hub.
Record #:
25363
Abstract:
With the invention of the da Vinci Surgical System, doctors from all over the world are coming to the Brody School of Medicine to learn how to use it. The da Vinci is used primarily for mitral valve replacements, but doctors are hopeful it will one day be used for other surgical procedures as well.
Record #:
25431
Abstract:
The Brody family has given many financial gifts to East Carolina University in the past. The biggest one was the one that built the Brody School of Medicine. David Brody talks about how he and his siblings got to where they are, and why they decided to give to ECU.