NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


24 results for Quirk, Bea
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
145
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke University library is home to the largest advertising archives in the nation, and is fast becoming a center for academic research in advertising history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 8, Jan 1992, p24-27, il
Full Text:
Record #:
196
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Climatic Data Center is based in Asheville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Feb 1992, p24-26, il
Full Text:
Record #:
577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many Charlotte executives are hoping that NCNB's merger with C&S/Sovran will boost the local economy and send some business their way.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p8-9, il
Record #:
607
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte will be building the North Carolina Performing Arts Center, a 177,000-square-foot facility.
Source:
Record #:
626
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reputation of North Carolina - especially Research Triangle Park - as a hotbed of medical research continues to grow, as an infusion of grants propels breakthroughs in cancer treatment, AIDS, and other diseases.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Nov 1991, p25-31, il
Record #:
622
Author(s):
Abstract:
An entire special section is dedicated to the city of Charlotte, its economy and its people.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, pA3-A30, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
634
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Charlotte Hornets National Basketball Association franchise is having a positive impact on the Queen City's economy.
Source:
Record #:
2556
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty-one planned or in-progress projects, including the Carolina Panther NFL Stadium, Farmers Market, NationsBank, and Ivey Townhomes, are transforming uptown Charlotte.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 10, Oct 1995, p14,16,18-19, il
Record #:
2727
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the North Carolina Zoological Park as its star attraction, Randolph County seeks to expand tourism. Other attractions include the Uwharrie Natural Forest and Seagrove potters.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p20-21, il
Record #:
2728
Author(s):
Abstract:
With business investments of over $300 million and 1,600 new jobs since 1991, Randolph County, the state's sixth most industrialized county, enjoys low unemployment and plans for further economic growth.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p17-19,22-23,26-29, il
Record #:
2967
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism is the state's second largest industry, and for years certain sections favored by history and geography got most tourist dollars. Today, creative marketing strategies and internet pages enable even the most rural counties to draw tourists.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 7, July 1996, p12,14-15, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
12616
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quirk provides an economic update on Charlotte, the county seat of Mecklenburg County the largest city in the Carolinas with a population of 350,000. During 1987, over six hundred firms either began business or expanded in the city, creating approximately 9,000 jobs and amounting to an investment approaching $1 billion.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p14, 16-18, 20, 22, 24, 66-67, il, por
Record #:
12617
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quirk describes University City in northeast Mecklenburg County, an area made up of four major components. The first two, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and University Research Park, are already in place. The two newer ones, University Place, a 250-acre, mixed-use planned development and the 130-bed University Hospital, complement and expand upon the first two.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p26, 28, 30, 32, il
Record #:
13007
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's top travel destination is a surprise to many people. It's not the beaches or mountains or Sandhills golfing resorts. It's Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. In 1988, their travel and tourism revenues reached $1.049 billion, accounting for 17.02 percent of the state's total.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 5, May 1990, p24, 26, 28, 30, il
Record #:
13030
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte/Mecklenburg County's recycling program ranks among the top 10 percent in the country based on participation, amount recycled, activities, and operations. Quick describes how this was accomplished.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p15-16, por