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35 results for Charlotte--Economic conditions
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Record #:
228
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Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham became national players in the 1980s by taking advantage of the state's advantages.
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634
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The Charlotte Hornets National Basketball Association franchise is having a positive impact on the Queen City's economy.
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Record #:
2184
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Opened February 1, 1995, the New Charlotte Convention Center is the largest public building project in state history. The center, with a price tag of $148 million, is among the nation's twenty largest in terms of total exhibit space.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 3, Mar 1995, p12, il
Record #:
2415
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With a solid economic foundation, strong business community, and a diverse, high-quality workforce, Charlotte is a growing economic giant, attracting foreign-owned firms and banking, health care, and professional sports enterprises.
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Record #:
2556
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Twenty-one planned or in-progress projects, including the Carolina Panther NFL Stadium, Farmers Market, NationsBank, and Ivey Townhomes, are transforming uptown Charlotte.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 10, Oct 1995, p14,16,18-19, il
Record #:
2859
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Charlotte's new convention center has doubled the business of its predecessor, hosting 285 events in 1995, compared to 87 events in 1994, and bringing $270 million to the metropolitan area. Nearly 350 events already are booked through the year 2010.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 6, June 1996, p16, il
Record #:
5244
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A mode of transportation from the past, a trolley car, has captured Charlotte's imagination. Car number 85, last used in 1938, was saved from the scrap heap by the Historic Landmarks Commission and restored. This trolley's run was one mile in 1997 and has since been extended, with three more trolleys added and three more additions planned. Goodpasture discusses the economic impact the trolleys are having on Charlotte.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 1, June 2002, p132-134, 136, 138-139, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6941
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Charlotte, the nation's fifth-largest urban region and second-largest financial center, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's “community profile.” The city boasts tall buildings; the Carolina Panthers NFL team; the Carolina Bobcats NBA team; places for eating, shopping, living, world-class entertainment; and a wide choice of educational opportunities, including UNC-Charlotte, Central Piedmont Community College, which serves 70,000 students, and Johnson & Wales University, famous for its culinary and business schools.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 11, Nov 2004, p29-30, 32-34, 36-38, 40, 42-48, il, map
Record #:
11919
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The nation's fourth largest apparel mart, the Charlotte Merchandise Mart, is becoming an increasingly powerful economic force in North Carolina. Boasting 90,000 different buyers and store owners, the Charlotte Merchandise Mart serves a ten state area whose 22,000,000 people have $27,000,000,000 in annual buying power. Strengthening local apparel manufacturing businesses as well as the North Carolina textile industry, vice president and general manager, William R. Overhultz, claims that the Charlotte Merchandise Mart will continue to grow, stimulating the economy as well as the, \"Southeast's greatest marketplace\".
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 14, Dec 1963, p20-21, 23, il, por
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Record #:
11968
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Charlotte, the nation's number two financial center, was hit hard by the banking crisis. Vitner discusses the region's economic outlook in 2010.
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Record #:
12616
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Quirk provides an economic update on Charlotte, the county seat of Mecklenburg County the largest city in the Carolinas with a population of 350,000. During 1987, over six hundred firms either began business or expanded in the city, creating approximately 9,000 jobs and amounting to an investment approaching $1 billion.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p14, 16-18, 20, 22, 24, 66-67, il, por
Record #:
14438
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The story of the growth of Charlotte and the work done by Clarence Kuester as the secretary-manager of the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce are practically one in the same.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 26, Nov 1947, p20-21, 23, 25-27, f
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Record #:
16192
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Beginning on July 23, 1,200 men were sent to open Camp Greene in Charlotte. It took six weeks to construct and at its height 40,000 troops lived at the camp. The camp not only trained troops for combat but improved the economic situation of Charlotte.
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Record #:
19394
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Charlotte has been one of the state's fastest growing cities in the past fifteen years. Since 1990, city officials and private corporations have turned the city's economic foundation from low-wage manufacturing jobs to a major banking center. The author reviews the city's successful economic growth and how the model could be applied to other cities.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 13 Issue , 2005, p82-85