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52 results for Charlotte--Description and travel
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Record #:
3422
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With a large international business community, professional sports teams, and major business relocations, Charlotte is nationally recognized. Yet the city preserves a sense of community that supports changes and rapid growth.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p16-18, 22,26,30,32-37, il
Record #:
3688
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Charlotte has much to offer tourists and the local residents, including professional basketball and football, 1,500 restaurants, museums, and music - from symphony to jazz. With $2.2 billion generated in 1997, the city is the state's leader in travel-related income.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 6, June 1998, p56, il
Record #:
6941
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Charlotte, the nation's fifth-largest urban region and second-largest financial center, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's “community profile.” The city boasts tall buildings; the Carolina Panthers NFL team; the Carolina Bobcats NBA team; places for eating, shopping, living, world-class entertainment; and a wide choice of educational opportunities, including UNC-Charlotte, Central Piedmont Community College, which serves 70,000 students, and Johnson & Wales University, famous for its culinary and business schools.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 11, Nov 2004, p29-30, 32-34, 36-38, 40, 42-48, il, map
Record #:
7700
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the Civil War ended, Charlotte's population was around 5,000. Today, over 650,000 people live there. In the space of 150 years, the town moved from being a farming area to an industrial one and then to a modern financial center. Adams describes three places that give visitors a feel for Charlotte's past: the Levine Museum of the New South, Mert's Heart and Soul Restaurant, and the Mint Museum of Craft + Design.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p166-168, 170, 172, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8785
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Charlotte has a unique assortment of gardens that bloom through each of the four seasons. Shirley describes one for each season: the Charlotte Museum of History and Hezekiah Alexander Homesite (spring); the McGill Rose Garden (summer); Elmwood Cemetery (fall); and the Susie Harwood Garden, UNCC Botanical Gardens (winter).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p118-120, 122, 124-125, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8970
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The McIntyre Historic Site was opened in October, 1976, just north of Charlotte. Visitors are invited to come and learn about the historical significance of the area as well as why Cornwallis dubbed Mecklenburg County “The Hornet's Nest.”
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p13, il
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Record #:
10885
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Tate describes things to see and do, where to stay and where to eat during a weekend visit to Charlotte.
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Record #:
13007
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The state's top travel destination is a surprise to many people. It's not the beaches or mountains or Sandhills golfing resorts. It's Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. In 1988, their travel and tourism revenues reached $1.049 billion, accounting for 17.02 percent of the state's total.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 5, May 1990, p24, 26, 28, 30, il
Record #:
13070
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Abstract:
This month's North Carolina magazine Community Profile features the city of Charlotte.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p25-26, 28, 30, 32, 36-51, il
Record #:
14048
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Abstract:
This month's BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA community profile features the city of Charlotte.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1984, p28-30, 32, 34, 36-38, 40 , il Periodical Website
Record #:
17772
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Markovich tells the modern story of North Carolina's largest city, Charlotte.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p138-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
23329
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The Thirsty Beaver Saloon, located in Plaza Midwood, is considered one of the most authentic places in Charlotte. Devores talked to the brothers who own and operate the saloon.
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Record #:
23941
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The U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte offers a variety of outdoor activities for outdoor enthusiasts. Whitewater rafting is not the only activity, for visitors can participate in ropes courses, ziplines, mountain biking, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, and hiking.
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North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Fall 2015, p10-13, il, por
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Record #:
23944
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As the two largest cities in North Carolina, Charlotte and Raleigh seemingly compete against each other. Author and journalist Scott Huler, insists that the cities do not actually compete, but rather learn from each other's triumphs and mistakes.
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