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18 results for Cities and towns--Growth
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Record #:
230
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Outside the domain of the metropolitan centers, smaller cities control their own economic principalities. Moderate growth suited North Carolina's second-tier regions in the 80s, but attracting jobs that slow the migration of talent remains a major challenge.
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228
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Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham became national players in the 1980s by taking advantage of the state's advantages.
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232
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Communities in the Triad (High Point, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem) are seeking to boost their economies with technology.
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227
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Kinney discusses various aspects of urban development in North Carolina from 1980 to 1990. Statistics and charts are provided.
Record #:
365
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The authors discuss the 1973 Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) and its implications for the North Carolina coast.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, May 1982, p2-13, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
446
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The article identifies four options for state-imposed local government regional planning laws. This piece lays out the pros and cons of each of the approaches as it addresses the question of the appropriate role of the state in local land-use planning.
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Record #:
484
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Avery County is developing planning strategies suited for economic growth and land use.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p9-13, il, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
499
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Bath is facing the challenge of accommodating growth without pushing its high costs onto residents. It is addressing its problems using the Coastal Area Management Act guidelines, state and federal funds, and active citizen participation.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Winter 1986, p44-48, il
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Record #:
820
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Lobbyist Bill Holman argues for an expanded state role in land use planning and regulations.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Spring 1990, p40-47, il
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Record #:
1906
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The Year of the Coast Conference marked the 20th anniversary of North Carolina's Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA). Ruley discusses land use planning on Topsail Island to assess CAMA's successes and failures.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 37, Sept 1994, p11-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2116
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Some things local government observers predict for North Carolina in 2005 include financially sound cities; a clean environment; expanded information networks; an older, more diverse population; and the Triad, Charlotte, and the Triangle coalescing.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Jan 1995, p1, 4-5, il
Record #:
3892
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Determining wise land use is a challenge for local governments. \"Shall land be protected or sold to developers?\" and \"Will development bring more revenues or more service demands?\" are common questions. To answer these questions, Chatham County is studying its commercial, farmland, residential, and industrial sectors to determine their revenue contributions and service demands.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 41, Nov 1998, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4940
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Smart growth has been characterized as an approach to land use planning that makes communities livable; for example, restoring center cities and older suburbs and preserving open spaces. Thirteen states have smart growth laws; fifteen others are studying them. Godschalk examines what other states, like Maryland and Washington, are doing and what North Carolina might do.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p12-20, il, f
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Record #:
5527
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Entire issue's focus is on land-use planning in Western North Carolina.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, 1993, p25-52, il, map
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Record #:
6818
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Abstract:
Levofsky writes, \"As metro areas continue to grow, rural communities will play a critical role in absorbing population and economic activity.\" Some rural communities have dealt with this growth through low-density development, including commercial strips, multi-lot planned housing developments, and outlying locations of public buildings. Other areas are employing smart growth techniques to preserve open space, maintain community character, provide adequate, affordable housing, and encourage compact, mixed-use development. Levofsky outlines the different patterns of sprawl and presents seven case studies that highlight smart growth successes in addressing rural sprawl.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Winter 2003, p3-21, il, f
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