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17 results for Regional planning
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Record #:
230
Abstract:
Outside the domain of the metropolitan centers, smaller cities control their own economic principalities. Moderate growth suited North Carolina's second-tier regions in the 80s, but attracting jobs that slow the migration of talent remains a major challenge.
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232
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Communities in the Triad (High Point, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem) are seeking to boost their economies with technology.
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374
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Wake County city and county planners address planning logistics for an expected boom in industry at Research Triangle Park.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Sept 1981, p39-42, il, por
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Record #:
644
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Triangle East (Rocky Mount, Wilson and Tarboro) forges ahead to bring economic prosperity to largely rural Eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
1074
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Regionalism, an idea in which small communities in the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area would share resources and plan together to solve major problems, is now a hot topic in the Triangle area (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill).
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 16, Apr 1993, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1133
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Dave Phillips, secretary of the Department of Economic and Community Development, outlines his vision for North Carolina's future, emphasizing his support for regionalism and regional planning.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 7, July 1993, p50-51, por
Record #:
1447
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The eleven-county Piedmont Triad Partnership has successfully used a regional approach to achieve increased industrial diversification and regional promotion.
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Record #:
1625
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Governor Hunt is being advised that a regional approach to the state's economic development is desirable because business and government leaders in the regions are more attuned to their particular situations than the bureaucracy in Raleigh is.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 6, June 1994, p43, por
Record #:
1626
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's three regional partnerships are creating successful marketing machines and bringing more jobs to the state. The success of these partnerships is fueling the push for regional economic planning.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 6, June 1994, p44, por
Record #:
31116
Abstract:
Carolina Planning regularly publishes a feature highlighting projects from members of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Planning Association (NCAPA). This year’s submissions focus on community planning initiatives that utilize a wide range of collaborations, ranging from updated citizen engagement techniques, partnering with the NC Department of Transportation to slow traffic and create a pedestrian street environment, and a variety of intergovernmental collaborations.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 39 Issue , 2014, p43-51, il
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Record #:
31120
Abstract:
While local governments are making efforts to create more inclusive social policies, little is known about what these policies are and how they are developed. To better understand municipal immigrant integration practices, my Master’s Thesis, Building Integrated Communities: Innovative Bureaucratic Incorporation Strategies for North Carolina, completed in May 2012 examined integration using two methods: 1) analyzing strategies local jurisdictions employ across the country to integrate immigrants and 2) presenting a case study to better understand the contextual, structural, and institutional factors of a two-year strategic planning process to develop an immigrant integration plan in three local jurisdictions in North Carolina, a new immigrant destination. From this analysis, I gleaned practical recommendations for other local governments interested in developing similar immigrant integration initiatives that will be discussed in this article.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p9-16, il, bibl
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Record #:
31113
Abstract:
A companion piece to Clinch River, this “deep dive” case study reports on the GroWNC regional long-range planning initiative in western North Carolina and provide valuable insights into this collaboration.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 39 Issue , 2014, p39-42, map
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Record #:
31147
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King addresses how planners can foster the development of local food systems and provides examples from across the state.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p42-44, bibl
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Record #:
31169
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Abstract:
The Western North Carolina Vitality Index is a web-based decision support tool that combines various data sources and indicators that are related to community sustainability.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 37 Issue , 2012, p50-52, il, map
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