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10 results for Coastal zone management
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Record #:
463
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Enormous population growth in coastal counties will cause severe problems for local governments in the upcoming years.
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Record #:
1316
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New federal and state administrations assume their positions and begin facing concerns over several state coastal issues, including wetlands, the proposed Oregon Inlet jetties, and shore erosion protection at Fort Fisher.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1993, p10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1685
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Sea Grant specialists Walter Clark and Barbara Doll will be analyzing the state's management of its coastal areas and resources. Target subjects include wetlands, special area management, cumulative impacts of development, and ocean resources planning.
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Record #:
1906
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The Year of the Coast Conference marked the 20th anniversary of North Carolina's Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA). Ruley discusses land use planning on Topsail Island to assess CAMA's successes and failures.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 37, Sept 1994, p11-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2917
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For years, Governor James B. Hunt, environmentalists, and private citizens have been urging the General Assembly to act to protect the coastal ecosystem, but it took hog spills, fish kills, and closed waters to cause legislators to act.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 1996, p2-6, il
Record #:
3679
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Passed by the 1997 General Assembly, HB 1059 amends the Coastal Area Management Act to allow certain kinds of development, like shops and restaurants, over public waters. The law has a three-year limit, and while developers see green and environmentalists red, no one is sure about the law's impact.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7790
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North Carolina's coast remained sparsely populated until the mid-20th-century. The attraction with the coast began with the influx of people during World War II. After hostilities ceased, a building boom began with high-rise hotels, condominium towers, strip malls, and beach houses crowding into environmentally delicate areas. The North Carolina Coastal Federation, organized in 1982, is a nonprofit organization that has a simple mission--protect the coast. La Vere discusses the NCCF's three-pronged strategy for coastal protection and the work of the state's three coastkeepers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p110-112, 114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25078
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The Coastal Habitat Protection Plan is undergoing a scheduled review and update to analyze the impact the plan has had and to evaluate its effectiveness.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2010, p22-25, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
8912
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Dean continues his report about ongoing disagreements between Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, that plans to develop a large part of Bald Head Island that it owns, the state which owns the other part, and conservationists who fear that development of any kind would be difficult without harming the environment. Dean interviewed William R. Henderson, president of Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, consulted numerous reports and scientific studies about the island and marshes, and talked to prominent scientists and ecologists and visited Bald Head.
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Record #:
8886
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Dean discusses the ongoing disagreement between Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, that plans to develop a large part of Bald Head Island that it owns, the state which owns the other part, and conservationists who fear that development of any kind would be difficult without harming the environment.
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