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22 results for Wetland conservation
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Record #:
770
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Wetlands in North Carolina are being lost and degraded by means of clear-cutting and development. This is a cause for concern because wetlands perform valuable functions that will be lost as well if the wetlands aren't protected.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Aug 1992, p2-6, il
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Record #:
1238
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A recent workshop was organized by wildlife officials to determine what management measures should be taken to conserve the Roanoke River floodplain for wildlife habitat.
Record #:
1316
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New federal and state administrations assume their positions and begin facing concerns over several state coastal issues, including wetlands, the proposed Oregon Inlet jetties, and shore erosion protection at Fort Fisher.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1993, p10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1744
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North Carolina has joined other states in the nation in restoring, and even creating, wetlands. The creation of wetlands is still a relatively new science, and its reliability is uncertain.
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Record #:
2918
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Because of their efficiency in filtering nutrients, sediments, and pathogens, the creation of streamside buffers and wetlands restoration are two approaches to returning the Neuse River to a healthy condition.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 1996, p11, il
Record #:
24026
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In 1986, Lake View Park Commission turned to the Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society for help with preventing a strip mall from being built on Beaver Lake and surrounding wetlands. Today, the area is a thriving bird sanctuary as a result of preservation and conservation efforts.
Record #:
25177
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Pamlico-Tar River Foundation director Dave McNaught discusses why wetlands are such a crucial part of the environment. Wetlands are important not only for the animals living there, but the people in the surrounding areas.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Spring 1990, p4, il
Record #:
25192
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The legal battle over the protection of wetlands continues and is contended all the way up to the federal level. Many factors are at play from big oil companies to environmental considerations.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Winter 1992, p4, il
Record #:
26710
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Abstract:
Revenues from federal duck stamps pay for wetlands and other habitats in wildlife refuges. This year, non-hunters are also encouraged to buy the stamps. A special art exhibit will be held at the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 3, May/June 1984, p6, il
Record #:
26714
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Major corporations, including the North Carolina Phosphate Corporation and Duke Power Company, endorsed a policy promoting conservation of wetland resources. They are now part of the Corporate Conservation Council created by the National Wildlife Federation.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 3, May/June 1984, p11, il
Record #:
684
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The battle was long and hard fought, but the winners are some of the remaining wetlands in the nation and their priceless wildlife. The victory is one that future generations will surely celebrate.
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Record #:
695
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The battle lines are drawn in Eastern North Carolina over whether the state can preserve its valuable and vanishing wetlands and still produce an endless supply of pulp and sawtimber.
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Record #:
697
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An environmental donnybrook is brewing in the east as forest practices in wetlands are being scrutinized as never before.
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Record #:
6
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The preservation of bottomlands is essential for wildlife well-being and water quality.
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Record #:
2207
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As the state's economy has grown, upwards of 50 percent of its wetlands have been lost. This statistic is questionable, however, because of a lack of data on the original extent of wetlands and disagreement over when a wetland is actually lost.
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