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12 results for Mitchell, Elisha, 1793-1857
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Record #:
1395
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Wright shows that, by using existing technology, Elisha Mitchell could have accurately measured the height of the Black Mountains without exposing himself to the risks that killed him in 1857.
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Record #:
2583
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Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the Eastern United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 6, Nov 1995, p33-35, il
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Record #:
3410
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A controversy between Elisha Mitchell and Thomas L. Clingman over who was first to identify, climb, and measure the tallest mountain in the state ended tragically when Mitchell fell to his death, while trying to prove his claim.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Sept 1997, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4674
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In the Black Mountain range in Yancy County stand six of the tallest peaks east of the Rocky Mountains. All exceed 6,500 feet. The tallest is Mt. Mitchell, at 6,684 feet, which is also the tallest in eastern North America. Named for its early explorer, Elisha Mitchell, the peak is a place of great beauty and weather extremes. Currently the mountain's Fraser firs are dying from an imported European pest and acid rain and fog. Development is slowly creeping in upon the mountain, also.
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Record #:
15278
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Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the eastern United States. In 1881-1882, the United States Geological Service confirmed his measurements and named the peak after him. Mitchell determined its height in 1835 and was killed in a fall on the mountain in 1857.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 23, Nov 1934, p5, 26, il
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Record #:
18693
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After Daniel Boone, North Carolina's most famous mountain man was Big Tom Wilson, who was a noted guide, tracker, bear hunter, and master story teller who lived in Yancey County. When Dr. Elisha Mitchell, in seeking to prove the height of a mountain later named for him, disappeared, it was Tom Wilson who lead a search party to find Mitchell's body in 1857 that brought him nationwide fame.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 16, Sept 1942, p5, 21
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Record #:
21461
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The first in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Elisha Mitchell, over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the Mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
21470
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina Elisha Mitchell over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
24026
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In 1986, Lake View Park Commission turned to the Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society for help with preventing a strip mall from being built on Beaver Lake and surrounding wetlands. Today, the area is a thriving bird sanctuary as a result of preservation and conservation efforts.
Record #:
16101
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Mount Mitchell, in Yancey County, was named for Dr. Elisha Mitchell after he met his death on the peaks. A professor at the University of North Carolina, Mitchell conducted many scientific studies throughout the Black Mountain range until he fell to his death in 1857. The mountain was named in his honor and a monument constructed at the peak of Mount Mitchell.
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Record #:
3560
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The state's most famous mountain man was Big Tom Wilson, who was a noted guide, tracker, bear hunter, and master story teller. However, it was leading a search party to find Elisha Mitchell's body in 1857 that brought him nationwide fame.
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Record #:
8300
Author(s):
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Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the eastern United States. After his death, the U.S. Geological Service in 1881-1882 upheld his measurements of the highest peak in the Black Mountain Range and officially named it after him.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p32-33, il, por