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28 results for Vance, Zebulon Baird, 1830-1894
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Record #:
1105
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Abstract:
Zebulon Vance, North Carolina politician, Confederate soldier, and southern patriot, was widely known for his sharp wit and sense of humor.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 1, June 1993, p10-12, por
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Record #:
2608
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Not every brandy maker can have his product extolled by a governor, but R. A. Bynum of Farmville was one. In 1879, Governor Zebulon B. Vance's statement praising the apple brandy appeared on the front page of THE RALEIGH OBSERVER.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 6, Nov 1987, p7, il
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Record #:
8737
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Civil War governor, Zebulon Baird Vance, was born in Reems Creek Valley outside Asheville in 1830. The Vance Birthplace was built around 1795, and has been a state historic site for twenty years. The outer walls of the main log house have been reconstructed, but most of the interior of the house is original. There are also six log outbuildings on the site. The house has workshops for students and teachers, including how to dip candles, cook over an open fire, and hand weave.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p9-10, il
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Record #:
8738
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During 1865, Governor Zeb Vance admitted it was impossible to continue to carry out his gubernatorial duties in Raleigh. He moved to Statesville that spring, but was arrested at his home on May 12, 1865 by Federalist forces. Because Vance was not involved in the profiteering common in the state at that time, the house is humble and hardly a mansion. The house is now a museum in honor of Vance and is open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
8842
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In 1877, Governor Zeb Vance began his third term, deeply concerned about the state of the North Carolina State Library. He enlisted the help of Cornelia Phillips Spencer from Chapel Hill to re-catalogue the entire collection. Once the catalogue was complete, the collection had to be reorganized by State Librarian Sherwood Haywood. Spencer's catalogue, if published, did not survive.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p10-12, 32, il, por
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Record #:
9289
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Abstract:
Many of Governor Zeb Vance's famous witticisms were recorded in two biographies of Vance, published in 1897 and 1965. However, STATE CHRONICLE journalist Walter Hines Page asked readers to send in stories told by Vance, and published them in the October 13, 1883 issues of the CHRONICLE. Several of them are re-printed in this article.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Jan 1980, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
10825
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When the end of the Civil War deprived Zeb Vance of the governorship of North Carolina and left him penniless, he turned to the lecture platform to earn the money he needed to support his family. Nearly all of the money was in the North and to it Vance looked for honorariums. Despite drawing barbs as the most notable ex-Confederate on the Northern lecture circuit, his innate gaiety, plus his mastery of words and the charisma of his personality, won him quick friends, and even Northerners lined up to guffaw at his low key tales from the North Carolina barnyard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 24, May 1969, p11-12, il
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Record #:
13981
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The Vance home in Buncombe County was built more than a century and a half ago by the grandfather of Governor Zebulon B. Vance.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 39, Feb 1951, p8, 20, f
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Record #:
14447
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Zebulon Vance was a North Carolinian the memory of whose valiant service to the State will live forever. He was not only a great soldier but also a great statesman.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 31, Jan 1948, p3-4, 22, f
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Record #:
15874
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Abstract:
Zebulon Baird Vance was North Carolina's famous wartime governor, 1862-1865. Previously he had commanded the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops in battles at New Bern and around Richmond. He was humiliated at war's end when Federal troops captured and carried him to a prison in Washington, D.C., where he was held for a considerable time. Vance triumphed, however, when he was again elected Governor and later a very popular U.S. Senator.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 40, Feb 1936, p6
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Record #:
18224
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Powell recounts the days after the end of the Civil War when Governor Zebulon Vance left Raleigh and was later taken prisoner at his home in Statesville.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 1, June 1941, p10-11, il
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Record #:
19758
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Abstract:
Governor Vance, elected the state's governor in 1862, faced reelection in 1864 and a difficult political decision; whether to join the growing anti-war movement or to keep North Carolina embroiled in the Confederacy's fight until the South successfully seceded. This two part article reviews the political strategizing amongst state politicians and Vance's own struggle for considering his constituents while also vying for re-election.
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Record #:
19769
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The second and final piece in this series, the article continues the discussion concerning political maneuvering of Governor Vance during his re-election in 1864. The article picks up with Governor Vance's determination to break with William Holden and the peace movement in 1863 and follows the heated political environment through to Vance's reelection in 1864.
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Record #:
20046
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This article looks at the gubernatorial career of Zebulon B. Vance during the period of the closing days of the Civil War focusing on his management, involvement, and actions on behalf of the state, North Carolina regiments, and soldiers as the war was coming to a close.
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Record #:
20205
Abstract:
On an evening in early 1880, Senator Zebulon B. Vance met his future wife, widow Mrs. Florence Steele Martin. Johnston writes about Vance's and Martin's courtship through their personal letters.
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