NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


17 results for Mount Mitchell
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
1395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright shows that, by using existing technology, Elisha Mitchell could have accurately measured the height of the Black Mountains without exposing himself to the risks that killed him in 1857.
Full Text:
Record #:
1794
Author(s):
Abstract:
Retired North Carolina Superior Court Judge John R. Friday offers fond recollections of his stint as a Mount Mitchell park ranger in the 1940s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 3, Aug 1994, p35-37, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the Eastern United States.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 6, Nov 1995, p33-35, il
Full Text:
Record #:
3410
Author(s):
Abstract:
A controversy between Elisha Mitchell and Thomas L. Clingman over who was first to identify, climb, and measure the tallest mountain in the state ended tragically when Mitchell fell to his death, while trying to prove his claim.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Sept 1997, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4674
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the Black Mountain range in Yancy County stand six of the tallest peaks east of the Rocky Mountains. All exceed 6,500 feet. The tallest is Mt. Mitchell, at 6,684 feet, which is also the tallest in eastern North America. Named for its early explorer, Elisha Mitchell, the peak is a place of great beauty and weather extremes. Currently the mountain's Fraser firs are dying from an imported European pest and acid rain and fog. Development is slowly creeping in upon the mountain, also.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
8404
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recalls his first trip to Mt. Mitchell in 1897. Wilson, who was five years old at the time, made the trip with his older brother and father. On the 1897 trip, the family spent four days visiting different mountain ranges and climbing to their summits. Wilson has returned to Mt. Mitchell many times since then, and even spent his honeymoon there in 1919. Today, the mountain is much easier to reach since roads and automobiles have taken the place of trails and horses.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p16-18, 30, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12194
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mt. Mitchell, highest mountain in eastern part of the country, is to be made more attractive and accessible to thousands of visiting travelers with the addition of new tower. The new tower is to be built of native stone and will be located north of the present tower on the highest point of the peak.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 7, Sept 1958, p27-28, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12631
Author(s):
Abstract:
Towering 6,684 feet above sea level, North Carolina's Mount Mitchell is the highest peak in Eastern America. On the summit is a North Carolina State Park in which no point is less than a mile above sea level. From many points along the Blue Ridge Parkway, there are superlative views of Mitchell and its rugged neighboring peaks in the Black Mountain Range between Asheville and Spruce Pine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p51-52, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13970
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mount Mitchell has log cabins, camping sites, outdoor furnaces, tables, firewood and many other conveniences.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 32, Jan 1951, p7, 17, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14260
Abstract:
It is comparatively easy to gain the top of Mount Mitchell today, but conditions were greatly different before the advent of good roads in the mountain area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 4, June 1947, p3-4, 25-26, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14715
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several of the highest peaks in the Appalachians are contained in Mount Mitchell State Park. The view in all directions is one of the most awe-inspiring in western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 18, Sept 1944, p3-4, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
23822
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mount Mitchell can be unforgiving and dangerous in the winter, but rangers work tirelessly to keep skiers and other tourists safe. The author describes a typical day for rangers during the winter months.
Subject(s):
Record #:
26095
Author(s):
Abstract:
Area residents in North Carolina are expressing varied reactions to the proposed Mount Mitchell National Park. Most show sentiments of distrust, particularly toward the intentions of the government and issues with resource exploitation and mass development.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Summer 1977, p6-7
Record #:
8300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the eastern United States. After his death, the U.S. Geological Service in 1881-1882 upheld his measurements of the highest peak in the Black Mountain Range and officially named it after him.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p32-33, il, por
Record #:
30502
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the highest mountain peaks in eastern North America, Mount Mitchell rises 6,684 feet above the Blue Ridge Parkway. Previously, Mount Mitchell has been considered difficult to photograph because many of the best locations were inaccessible. But now, new roads allow photographers to picture Mount Mitchell in new ways.
Source:
Subject(s):