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10 results for Clingman, T.L. (Thomas Lanier), 1812-1897
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Record #:
8271
Abstract:
Casstevens discusses the life of Thomas L. Clingman, a historical figure he encountered while working on a thesis. During the Civil War, Clingman became associated with the “Clingman Raid.” It was rumored at the time Clingman led into Illinois a group of thieves that supposedly stole horses and terrorized local communities. Casstevens argues that Clingman probably had nothing to do with this raid because he was never caught or officially proven to have been in Illinois. The author also demonstrates how Republican leaders might have created the hoax to increase their support in the 1864 election. Included in the article is a brief biography of Clingman who was a North Carolina antebellum statesman born in Surry County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p11-12, il
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Record #:
9814
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Abstract:
Senator Thomas Lanier Clingman, who was born in Yadkin County in 1812, graduated at the top of his class from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He served as a representative and senator, was a Whig and later a Democrat, and defeated his opponents in landslide elections. Clingman was a general during the Civil War. Clingman's Dome, one of the highest peaks in the Smoky Mountains, is named for him. He died in Morganton in 1897.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 3, Aug 1975, p15-17, 34, il, por
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Record #:
12593
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Abstract:
William A. Graham, Willie Person Mangum, George E. Badger, and Thomas L. Clingman, men of high influence and public attainment, are often overlooked for their contributions to the history of North Carolina. Involved in statewide legislature and serving as either governor, constitutional lawyer, presidential candidate, or aspirant for the position as Justice of the United States Supreme Court, each of these four men are deserving of recognition for their public service to the peoples of North Carolina. (This is a two part article. The following segment can be found in the next issue, 1 August 1966, Vol. 34, No. 5.)
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 4, July 1966, p9-10, 12, por
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Record #:
12595
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Abstract:
The second segment of a two-piece article written in an attempt to salvage the history regarding the careers of William A. Graham, Willie Person Mangum, George E. Badger, and Thomas L. Clingman, this article focuses on Thomas Clingman. An Asheville Whig turned Democrat, Thomas Clingman served seven terms in the House and two in the Senate. The last Senator to resign after secession, Clingman offered additional support in the fields of science and mountain exploration. (The first part of this article can be found in the previous issue, 15 July 1966, Vol. 34, No. 4.)
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Aug 1966, p9-10, 20, por
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Record #:
14834
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Thomas Clingman was elected to the North Carolina State House of Commons in 1835 and to the State Senate in 1840, where he was one of the outstanding builders of western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 46, Apr 1945, p6-7, 21
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Record #:
14896
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Thomas Lanier Clingman born in Huntsville became an eminent resident and well-respected scholar within the state. He attended University of North Carolina and upon graduation in 1832 held the distinction of being first in every class he had ever attended. He studied law independently under Mr. W. A. Graham of Hillsboro. In 1840 he was elected to the North Carolina Senate followed by appointment in 1843 to the U.S. Congress. He and Thomas Bragg became U.S. Senators in 1857 and served until the Civil War. Clingman earned a respectable war record and was wounded in several engagements. Beyond his civic career, Clingman studied geology and meteorology.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943, p4-5, il
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Record #:
21216
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A look at Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman's role in the transition of support away from the Whig party in the mid-1850s in North Carolina.
Record #:
21321
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This article examines opposing historical perspectives on Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman's change in political parties from Whig to Democrat and its potential effect on the subsequent decline of the Whig party. A particular focus is given to Clingman's thoughts on national and state issues including state funding for transportation projects, geographic balance of power within the state of North Carolina, the lack of prominence of Whig mountaineers in party politics, and the issue of southerners' rights to take slaves into newly acquired territories.
Record #:
21538
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Abstract:
An examination of the post-Civil War political activities of North Carolina Congressman and Senator, Thomas Lanier Clingman, which provides a look into the issues, power struggles, and personalities of North Carolina politics during the first two decades after the Civil War. Particular attention is given to Clingman's involvement in the \"railroad ring\" fraud orchestrated by George W. Swepson and Milton S. Littlefield, in which Swepson invested $843,633 dollars of state appropriated bond sales proceeds meant for use in expansion of state railroads into three Florida railroads for personal profits, aided by Littlefield's bribery and manipulation of legislators. Clingman's role as Swepson's attorney put him in the thick of the controversy and prevented a resurgence of his political career.
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Record #:
37893
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Abstract:
At 6,684 feet, its cited as the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. Mount Mitchell offers a panoramic view, if one reaches the top of the mountain on a clear day, a condition noted by the author as impossible 8 out of every 10 days of the year.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p100-102, 104 Periodical Website