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1217 results for North Carolina Historical Review
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Record #:
19525
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Abstract:
In the early 20th-century, Native Americans still located in the southeast were embedded in the racial tensions of the regions. However, groups such as the Lumbee of North Carolina were able to manipulate, subvert, and adapt to the shifting tides of racial supremacy and provide for themselves access to education.
Record #:
19524
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In response to the smallpox epidemic in other parts of the United States, North Carolina took action to safeguard its inhabitants by instituting an approach to public health similar to towns like Boston. Watson discusses the development of public health in the state in response to smallpox and the evolution of preventative measures.
Record #:
19523
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Although under-realized from a historic standpoint, Smith calls attention to slavery in North Carolina's Piedmont, and suggests new areas of research and analysis.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 90 Issue 1, Jan 2013, p1-25, il, por, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19529
Abstract:
The state's War Savings Campaign was headquartered in Winston-Salem and organized by Col. F.H. Fries appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. The campaign focused on two goals; first, to make citizens more aware of World War I and second, to finance war efforts. The campaign raised $27,649,397, only 56.8 percent of the state's intended goal of $48,666,380.
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Record #:
19530
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A reprint of Colonel Joseph Hyde Pratt's diary maintained from May 18, 1918 through July 7, 1918. Col. Pratt was from Chapel Hill and commissioned October 9, 1918.
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Record #:
19528
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This is a reprint of an address delivered by Dr. Albert Shaw to the State Literary and Historical Association of North Carolina at Raleigh on December 7, 1923. Dr. Shaw comments on the importance of historical research and the role of historians for the United States in the early 20th-century.
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Record #:
19534
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Richard Dobbs Spaight was born in New Bern on March 25th, 1758 to Richard Spaight, a grand nephew of colonial Governor Arthur Dobbs. The article offers a biographical sketch of Spaight's life and his successful career as a state politician.
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Record #:
19543
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English settlements in America were organized through charters, a legal document granting private individuals to own and govern pieces of land until the Lords of Trade recognized this did not serve England and began dissolving these charters. For North Carolina, the author looks at the history of charters within the state in two distinct periods; the first from 1706-1726 when charter owners were persuaded to give up their claims either by law or voluntarily and the second from 1726-1729 when charters were purchased out right from their proprietors.
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Record #:
19536
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The article is a summation of the history and establishment of the North Carolina Fuel Administration as culled from the administration's records. The Fuel Administration began in 1917 and primary function was to monitor food and fuel supplies during World War I. An appendix to the article lists both state and local fuel administrators by name, address, designation, date of employment, and whether these members served on a voluntary or salary basis.
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Record #:
19542
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Part III, the second appearing in volume 1 issue 2 of this journal, of Colonel Pratt's diary reprinted here and covering his service from July 31, 1918 to August 16, 1918.
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Record #:
19537
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Part II, the first appearing in volume 1 issue 1 of this journal, of Colonel Pratt's diary reprinted here and covering his service from July 8, 1918 to July 30, 1918.
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Record #:
19539
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Doctor Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, gave a memorial address at the unveiling of the Aycock statue in Raleigh. Recounted here by Dr. Alderman is the Governor's beloved reputation across the state and some of Alderman's personal anecdotes from encounters with the Governor Aycock both before and during office.
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Record #:
19541
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Rev. Rights attempts to reconstruct the state's Native American history through sparse historical records. Specifically, the article records tribes' history within the Piedmont region in Orange, Chatham, Wilkes, Carbarrus counties. He studies material culture to better understand the Native American population that once inhabited the Piedmont.
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Record #:
19540
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Daniels' address delivered at the Aycock Memorial Ceremony offers a biographical sketch of the former governor -- from his childhood to his death on April 4, 1912. The author discusses Governor Aycock's family, education, early career, and eventual role as state governor.
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Record #:
19535
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Abstract:
Fries discusses her passion and conviction for historical research. She makes the analogy that historical research is akin to a jigsaw puzzle in the sense that both require assembling pieces to form an entire picture. To further this analogy, she discusses the life of Anna Nitschmann as pieced together through historical research.
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