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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Black Mountain
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Record #:
1050
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There exist discrepancies in various sources regarding the actual height of certain peaks in the Black Mountains of North Carolina.
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Record #:
1395
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Wright shows that, by using existing technology, Elisha Mitchell could have accurately measured the height of the Black Mountains without exposing himself to the risks that killed him in 1857.
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Record #:
4674
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In the Black Mountain range in Yancy County stand six of the tallest peaks east of the Rocky Mountains. All exceed 6,500 feet. The tallest is Mt. Mitchell, at 6,684 feet, which is also the tallest in eastern North America. Named for its early explorer, Elisha Mitchell, the peak is a place of great beauty and weather extremes. Currently the mountain's Fraser firs are dying from an imported European pest and acid rain and fog. Development is slowly creeping in upon the mountain, also.
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Record #:
9953
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In 1915, the World Film Corporation filmed “Then I'll Come Back to You” in Yancey County, filming scenes on Sunset Mountain and in the Pensacola area. The film, which starred Alice Brady and Jack Sherrill, featured lumber camp, river, and railroad scenes that were shot on the newly completed Black Mountain Railroad, at the Carolina Spruce Company band mill, and on the banks of the Cane River.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 18, Apr 1973, p16-18, il, por
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Record #:
13113
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Containing an image showing the peaks of the Black Mountain Range of North Carolina, this article briefly discusses the geography and activities present in the region.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 24, Apr 1957, p24-25, il
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Record #:
23801
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The Black Mountain Marathon is a 26-mile trail run in February, in which competitors climb more than 2,850 feet in brutal weather.
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Record #:
24694
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling on Black Mountain, a peak in the Alleghany Mountains that is today known as Mitchell.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p17-18, il
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Record #:
24699
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The author presents the history and appeal of the Toe River Valley, which is a valley by virtue of its drainage system and the high mountain ranges, such as the Black Mountains, Blue Ridge, and Unakas, that hem it in. The article highlights some of the popular tourist attractions in the area.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 2, June 1952, p3-5, 21-25, il
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Record #:
24696
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes various Cherokee legends pertaining to Black Mountain in the Alleghany Mountains.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 26, May 1955, p10-11
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Record #:
29843
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The Black Mountain Center for the Arts is ushering in its eleventh annual Art in Bloom, a flower-filled festival that will take place in mid-June, followed by an exhibit of plein air paintings. This multi-faceted event includes two different gallery shows, a display of floral arrangements, a gala and a garden tour.
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Record #:
29842
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Black Mountain, North Carolina has a longstanding tradition of being at the forefront of the arts. Visitors go to this small town to tour working art studios and galleries, as well as to experience its scenic nature. Black Mountain is framed by the Seven Sisters, the range of seven mountains ascending to Graybeard Mountain.
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Record #:
30163
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Known for years as the Black Brothers, Mt. Craig and Big Tom mountains near Mt. Mitchell, are the last of the Black Mountain peaks to be officially named by the Federal Board of Geographical names. Soaring nearly as tall as the peak of Mt. Mitchell, Mt. Craig and Big Tom can only be explored on foot given their range of forbidding forests.
Record #:
34853
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In Buncombe County, a small town with a lively community sits nestled between the mountain tops. Black Mountain has become a top destination in North Carolina, offering restaurants, antique and woodworking shops, and places to relax and enjoy the ambience.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 10, March 2018, p80-95, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35911
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Lodging profiles boasting hospitality offer a mountain of proof. Those with long standing reputations: Fairfield Inn, established 1896; Monte Vista Hotel, established 1919; Stonehearth, presently an inn, formerly antique shop and restaurant. Lodgings with a more recent reputation for comfort: Hound Ears Lodge and Club, Floridians comprising fifty percent of membership; Waynesville Country Club Inn, guest list including fraternities on ski trips; and Fontana Village Resort, fireplaces in their rooms; Sunshine Inn, inspired by the bed and breakfasts in Ireland.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p46-47
Record #:
37423
Author(s):
Abstract:
The dulcimer, often associated with Western North Carolina, found places other than the region’s lumber mills and was found long before the nineteenth century. Introduced in Europe by returning Crusaders, its origins can be traced back to Greece and the Near East.