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Record #:
22216
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Caroline Long founded St. Gerard House in Hendersonville in 2010 for children, like her son and daughter, who have autism. This article describes the work of the House and some of the teaching methods used. In North Carolina one in 97 children are diagnosed with it. In the 2009-2010 academic year, the NC Department of Public Instruction reported 10,664 students.
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22214
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Madison discusses the work of ceramist Keith Phillips whose studio is in Fletcher. He began his artistic work as a printmaker after receiving his BFA degree from East Carolina University. He was later an assistant to noted ceramist Walter Davis in Montana.
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22219
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Born in 1858 in Rutherford County, James Vester Miller was the son of a slave, Louisa, and her white owner. After the Civil War, his mother took her three children and made her way to Asheville. There Miller's interest in building developed and he was soon considered one of the city's master masons. He formed a company, Miller & Sons Construction, which specialized in churches and commercial buildings during the late 1880s and early 20th century. Among his noted works are the Post Office & Federal Building, later torn down, St. Matthias Episcopal Church, St. James A.M.E. Church, and Hopkins Chapel. He was also instrumental in the establishment of Violet Hill Cemetery for African Americans in West Asheville.
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22220
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Rafael Guastavino was an accomplished Spanish architect when he came to the United States in 1881. His first major work was the Boston Library which made him famous in the East and soon caught the eye of George W. Vanderbilt, who commissioned him in 1890 to build the arches at Biltmore Estate in Asheville. Guastavino had developed and patented the technique, known as the Tile Arch System in 1885. He later built his own retirement home, a twenty-five room structure near Black Mountain. In North Carolina his work is found in Duke Chapel in Durham, the Jefferson Standard Building in Greensboro, the Motley Memorial in Chapel Hill, and Basilica Shrine of St. Mary in Wilmington. He is buried in the crypt of the Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville, which was one of his last projects.
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22218
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Michael Sherrill is a sculptor whose studio is in the woods near Bat Cave. His hallmark is sculptures of the natural world--some life-size and some exaggerated in scale, hues and texture. Galleries and private collectors the world over have sought his work. He has also invented a line of ceramic tools, called Mudtools, which are shipped to artists around the world. His works have appeared in the Smithsonian, Clinton Presidential Library & Museum, and Inchon, South Korea's World Ceramic Center.
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22221
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\"Truly magnificent gardens need time and attention to flourish--coaxed and nurtured by guiding hands and verdant vision.\" Milner takes readers on a walk through Peter and Jasmin Gentling's garden, called Blue Briar Garden located on Sunset Mountain in Asheville. They have cultivated it over the last forty years. The garden serves as a backdrop to their home, historic Blue Briar Cottage, built in 1906 and purchased by them in 1971.
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22217
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Andrew Snavely opened Dobra Tea on Asheville's Lexington Avenue in 2010. He travels the world searching for the leaves, buds, and flowers that are later steeped at his shop. Among the places where he has collected are Laos, Japan, India, China, and Taiwan. He not only brings back the tea, but also more knowledge of this ancient beverage and its cultural ties.
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22239
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David Holt is known for many accomplishments, among them winning four Grammys. In this article he shares from a thirty-year-old collection of thousands of photographs taken of people, famous and little known, who made old-time music in the Southern Appalachians and elsewhere.
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22238
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Phyllis Heil's mother frowned upon her whistling while she was growing up, preferring that she sing gospel hymns. In 2001, Heil, who lives in Hickory, began whistling, practicing, and building a repertoire. In 2004 she entered the International Whistlers Convention in Louisburg and took third place. She was named International Whistling Entertainer of the Year the following year; she has now won the award five times.
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22236
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Martha Enzmann is a multifaceted artist--painter, puppeteer, educator, rug designer, sculptor, and toymaker. She and her husband moved from Minnesota to Todd in 1996 and renovated an old elementary school, turning it into the nonprofit Elkland Art Center. There she offers art classes while continuing her own work. She is also a creative force in designing parades, having done 35, two of which have been in France.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May 2012, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
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22240
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Harvey Littleton is the Father of American Art Glass, the instigator of the Studio Glass Movement. He pioneered the use of glass as an art form, and his experiments made it possible to move glassmaking from the factory to the individual artist's studio. In 1977 he came to Western North Carolina to be closer to the Penland School and to continue his work.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May 2012, p64-71, il, por Periodical Website
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22237
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Reardon relates things to see and do on a visit to Bryson City. 1,300 year-round residents live there, and the town is a hub for outdoor activities in nearby national forests and parks.
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Record #:
22249
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Madison explores the life and works of Asheville artist Julyan Davis, who graduated from London's Byam Shaw School of Art in 1988. He later came to the US and settled on Scaly Mountain near Highlands, where he had his studio for ten years. In 1992 he purchased a house formerly owned by Peggy Seeger, sister of Pete Seeger in Asheville's Montford neighborhood.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 4, June 2012, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22250
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Milner describes Graveyard Fields, one of the most popular stops along the Blue Ridge Parkway, located at Milepost 418.
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Record #:
22269
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Long before there were websites and e-mails, travelers who wanted to send home pictures of where they were relied on postcards. In 1914, Lamar LeCompte started the Asheville Post Card Company in Asheville. His products cost a penny to purchase and another penny to mail. The cards also helped launch the region as a tourist destination. The company closed in the late 1970s, but the postcards live on in books, articles, archives, museums, and online collections.
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