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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Reardon, Melissa
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Record #:
22237
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Reardon relates things to see and do on a visit to Bryson City. 1,300 year-round residents live there, and the town is a hub for outdoor activities in nearby national forests and parks.
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22284
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Looking for something to do on an October weekend? Come to Hayesville in Clay County for the annual Punkin Chunkin Festival. The object to see how far you can toss a pumpkin and there is no restriction on the type of device used--hand-built catapults, medieval-style trebuchets, even air cannons. The event originated in Bridgeville, Delaware in 1986, the Hayesville one four years ago.
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Record #:
23863
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Brian Boggs is leading the handmade furniture industry in Asheville, North Carolina. His goal is 'construction with a conscience,' as the woodworker focuses on using wood from locally felled trees and supports sustainable forestry management.
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Record #:
29597
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The main reason people go to Burnsville, North Carolina is to visit Mount Mitchell, the East’s tallest peak. Other reasons to visit Burnsville include a robust artist community, a quaint and thriving downtown, and starry night skies. In 2014, Burnsville became the first International Dark Sky Park in the southeastern United States, and recently opened the new Bare Dark Sky Observatory.
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Record #:
23873
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From historic towns and ports to pristine beaches, Carteret County's Crystal Coast in the Southern Outer Banks presents the tourist with a wide variety things to do and places to go.
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Record #:
29602
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Five North Carolina jewelry designers, each with a unique skill set and expression of style, are making one-of-a-kind adornments. Their jewelry is made from a variety of natural materials using a range of artistic techniques. They describe their pieces as a reflection of spirituality, a representation of history, ecocentrism, and wearable works of art.
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22325
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Johnnie Sue Myers and her husband Soney are a Cherokee couple who preserve Cherokee cooking traditions and Southern Appalachian cookery. He is an adept hunter who brings in the likes of deer, bear, turkey, and rabbit, and Johnnie Sue prepares the meals. Their five sons who live nearby also help by gathering all sorts greens in the spring and helping with the fall harvests of corn, okra, squash and lots more. Their home is a true gathering place for meals, with family and friends, including Chief Michell Hicks and others.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p64-69, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22356
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\"The Brasstown home of artist Sandy Webster and her husband, Lee, houses an inspired gallery of artworks and artifacts from near and far.\"
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Record #:
23866
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Bogs are among the most imperiled habitats in the mountains. In Western North Carolina, conservationists hope to bring these ecosystems back from the brink of extinction through the creation of a wildlife refuge.
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Record #:
23875
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The author visits the Creasmans, third-generation apple growers in Henderson County, to discuss the business of owning an orchard in the cradle of North Carolina's apple crop.
Record #:
22318
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The authors describe several outdoor entrepreneurs in Western North Carolina \"who mix business and pleasure in the pursuit of great gear.\" They are Adam Masters [Bellyak];Mike Grimm and Goose Kearse [Misty Mountain Threadworks]; Jesse Conner [Trout Dancer Rod Company];Fritz Orr, III [Fritz Orr Canoe]; and Tom Dempsey and Tom Reeder [Sylvan Sport].
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 4, June 2012, p56-63, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22335
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Seven people in Western North Carolina \"are impacting the lives of others through job training, cultural arts outreach, language skills tutoring, community enrichment, and sheltering animals.\" They are Jennifer Pickering (LEAF); DeWayne Barton and Dan Leroy [Green Opportunities];Steve and Susie van der Vorst [Camp Spring Creek for dyslexic children];Rob Pulleyn [Marshall High Studios]; and Jeri Arledge [Rusty's Legacy, for dogs people don't want or can no longer afford].