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9 results for Burnsville--Description and travel
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Record #:
2075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burnsville, named for privateer Captain Otway Burns, is the seat of Yancey County. The changing seasons and variety of activities draw many tourists who appreciate the slow mountain pace.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p12, il
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Record #:
3487
Author(s):
Abstract:
For people who enjoy the comforts of bed and breakfast inns, the historic town of Burnsville, in Yancey County, offers one of the state's finest- -the Nu-Wray Inn. The inn dates from 1834 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Record #:
8938
Abstract:
Burnsville, county seat of Yancey County, is Our State magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town was named for Otway Burns, a privateer during the War of 1812. Mining mica and gems, flax cultivation, wild ginseng collecting, and logging supported Burnsville during the 19th-century, but retail and tourism industries propel the town's economy today. Tourist attractions include the McElroy House, NuWray Inn, DK Puttyroot and The Orchid Tearoom, and Lil Smoky's Drive-in & Restaurant.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22419
Abstract:
Burnsville in Yancey County is named for Captain Otway Burns, a famous privateer in the War of 1812. Among the things to see and do are spending a few days in the Nu Wray Inn, dining at the Hilltop Restaurant, or making stops at the Design Gallery, Peddler Quilt Shop, the Toe River Arts Council and Gallery, and the Orchid Tearoom.
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Record #:
24656
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the heart of the Hill Country in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Asheville, Burnsville, Hot Springs, and Black Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p16-19, 49, il
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Record #:
24773
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nu Wray Inn in Burnsville originally opened in 1833. Over the years, the structure has been renovated, had name changes, and gotten new owners, but its charm still attracts visitors. The full service hotel has had notableguests such as Elvis Presley, Mark Twain, and Jimmy Carter.
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Record #:
29597
Author(s):
Abstract:
The main reason people go to Burnsville, North Carolina is to visit Mount Mitchell, the East’s tallest peak. Other reasons to visit Burnsville include a robust artist community, a quaint and thriving downtown, and starry night skies. In 2014, Burnsville became the first International Dark Sky Park in the southeastern United States, and recently opened the new Bare Dark Sky Observatory.
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Record #:
29670
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mountain town of Burnsville, located northeast of Asheville, North Carolina, is a popular tourist destination. People visit Burnsville for its unique art galleries, antique stores, nature, stargazing, and access to Mount Mitchell, the highest peak east of the Rockies.
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Record #:
38149
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burnsville’s identity is defined by more than a nineteenth century privateer. As much as nearby Mount Mitchell State Park, town square festivals, and local businesses, Burnsville is defined by art. As noted by the author, the art is around downtown, in Toe River Studio and EnergyXchange, and at a glass blower’s Quonset hut. Perhaps not surprising: the 500 artists residing in Yancey County give it one of the greatest concentration of artists in the country.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 2, July 2013, p36-38, 40, 42-46 Periodical Website