NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


16 results for Tourism--North Carolina, Western
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
5521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although he is relatively unknown today, James Mills Flack was a major player in promoting tourism in the state's mountains in the early 20th-century. Flack owned and operated the Mountain View Inn, which opened in 1895 and was one of the largest and finest hotels in Chimney Rock. Cole discusses Flack and his efforts in tourism development.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
11939
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old Trudge lists the many superlatives of Western North Carolina for those tourists seeking wonder and adventure. Trudge lists the many sightseeing spots of the area, including but not limited to, Mount Mitchell, the Biltmore Estate and Gardens at Asheville, the mineral museum on Blue Ridge Parkway, and the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p17-18, por
Full Text:
Record #:
15474
Author(s):
Abstract:
Linville Caverns, the only known underground caverns in North Carolina, will be opened to the public by late summer. This newest development in the famed Linville region is expected to become one of the leading tourist attractions in western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 51, May 1937, p7, 24, f
Full Text:
Record #:
23070
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina has been a destination for summer travelers for over one hundred years. This article includes a detailed list of twenty-four great adventures in the region, including hiking, watersports, mountain biking, culture, food, breweries, and more.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 9 Issue 3, May-June 2015, p56-69, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
23123
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site in Flat Rock, North Carolina is considered a peaceful place to visit. This article briefly covers the history of the home and its establishment as a National Historic Site.
Full Text:
Record #:
24658
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the far west region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Waynesville, Cherokee, Murphy, and Hayesville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p26-32, 55, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24656
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the heart of the Hill Country in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Asheville, Burnsville, Hot Springs, and Black Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p16-19, 49, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24657
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Sapphire Country in southwestern North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Hendersonville, Tryon, Brevard, and Franklin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p20-25, il
Full Text:
Record #:
26923
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph M. Gazzam built the Kenilworth Inn in 1890, following a tourist boom in Asheville due to the completion of the Western North Carolina Railroad 10 years prior. The hotel featured a number of amenities and had a prime location overlooking the Swannanoa River. Unfortunately, in April 1909, the hotel burnt to the ground, but in 1923, it was rebuilt and reopened as a resort hotel.
Full Text:
Record #:
27648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located just two hours west of Charlotte, Hendersonville is an ideal place to visit when looking for peace and quiet. Journalist, Adam Rhew discusses his visit to Hendersonville and the Carl Sandburg Home in Flat Rock.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29347
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fall and winter travel season has opened in the North Carolina mountains. And while the mountains are evolving into a year-round destination, the trend is benefitting the region's tourism industry.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Oct 1991, p33-35, por
Record #:
30422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although summer in the mountains is a highlight, more and more tourists are discovering the North Carolina Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains in early fall. The fall foliage along with mild climate and myriad of activities, are among the many reasons for the growing popularity of the mountains resorts in this season.
Source:
Record #:
30803
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hundreds of beautiful vistas and sites draw visitors to Boone, Asheville, Cherokee, and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. From mountain hiking and fishing to scenic drives, the western region of North Carolina provides unique tourist opportunities.
Source:
Record #:
30813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ziplining offers travelers a way to take an aerial view of North Carolina’s natural scenic beauty. About a dozen zipline attractions have been built in the last few years in the state. This article provides a list and descriptions of eleven zipline canopy tours offered in western North Carolina.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
31591
Author(s):
Abstract:
Boone, North Carolina is a mountain village, university town, tourist mecca, and industrial center, drawing people in for a variety of reasons. This article profiles Boone and highlights various tourist attractions, such as ski resorts, the Winebarger’s Grist Mill, hang gliding school, and crafts.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1977, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website