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54 results for Tourism--North Carolina
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Record #:
8949
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Abstract:
Administered by the Travel and Tourism Division of the State Department of Commerce in Raleigh, North Carolina currently has five Welcome Centers on its borders. Called information specialists, the women who work at the centers dispense information regarding tourist sites and distances to various attractions. They estimate about half of the out-of-state visitors are visiting North Carolina for the first time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p23-24, il
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Record #:
12659
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Abstract:
Travelers this year will enjoy some new attractions, as development for tourism takes center stage in North Carolina. Southport's Boiling Springs Lake will be a new place for travelers to visit in July, with the construction of a motel and adjacent golf course with club house.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 26, May 1962, p11, il
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Record #:
12731
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In visiting a new area, people often ask about the location of good restaurant fare and entertainment, eliciting the response from most locals that there is little good to eat or fun attractions. The fiction that high-priced eating places will draw immense local crowds persists, and continues to trap enthusiastic people into making foolish investments. Drawing on the local restaurant fare and available leisure activities, a list of fine motels, outdoor dramas, and travel improvements aid the local and tourist alike in finding acceptable alternatives in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 13, Nov 1961, p36-37
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Record #:
14173
Author(s):
Abstract:
Goerch compares his list of the prettiest places in North Carolina to that of Bill Sharpe - they agree on five, but as far as the remaining five are concerned, they are at considerable variance.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 34, Jan 1950, p3-6, f
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Record #:
23057
Abstract:
Ten southern towns located less than ninety minutes from major cities provide small-town charm and an opportunity for weekend trips. Included in the list is Davidson, North Carolina, located on Lake Norman and just thirty minutes north of Charlotte.
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Record #:
24259
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In Depression-era North Carolina, the state was mostly agrarian despite the increase in industrialization. Still, the wealthy took vacations. This new travel culture prompted state officials to develop a tourism trade for North Carolina based on its natural resources, the mountains and the sea.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p39-40, 42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24368
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The tourism industry in North Carolina boomed in 1987, and the industry's impact is steadily increasing. Charlotte is just one community where hotels are providing jobs close to home and capitalizing on the tourism market.
Record #:
24454
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This article presents passenger routes in North Carolina, such as Tweetsie Railroad, that serve as tourist attractions and relics of North Carolina’s past.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p24-29, il
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Record #:
24479
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Though their role is no longer what it used to be, historic coastal lighthouses are still an important part of the state’s history and tourism industry. This article discusses the status of the various lighthouses, including the ones that are still active and those that may be in danger of falling.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p7-10, il
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Record #:
24620
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The authors discuss the history of Clay County, North Carolina and suggest places of interest to tourists.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 4, July 1963, p14-16, il
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Record #:
24658
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the far west region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Waynesville, Cherokee, Murphy, and Hayesville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p26-32, 55, il
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Record #:
24656
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the heart of the Hill Country in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Asheville, Burnsville, Hot Springs, and Black Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p16-19, 49, il
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Record #:
24659
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Northeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Kill Devil Hills, the Outer Banks, and the Albemarle Sound.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p33-37, il
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Record #:
24655
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Abstract:
The author provides and inventory of things to do, places to go, and sights to see in the North Carolina in 1959.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 26, May 1959, p7-52, il, map
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Record #:
24661
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Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the southeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on Wrightsville Beach, Brunswick Beach, and Topsail Island.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p44-49, il
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