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29 results for Buncombe County--History
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Record #:
12030
Abstract:
Arriving to Buncombe County during the last decade of the 18th-century, Scottish Presbyterians, locally known as the Swanino Circuit, opened the first school and church west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Followed by Methodists, Baptists, and Episcopalians, the region gradually developed as did the number of learning institutions and houses of worship.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 1, June 1957, p18-19, il
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Record #:
12029
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Abstract:
First settled in 1784, Buncombe County became more accessible to outsiders with the opening of US Highway 70. Sustained via tourism, agriculture, and industry, Buncombe residents enjoy the Blue Ridge Mountains, the city of Asheville, as well as the world-famous Biltmore Estate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 1, June 1957, p14-17, 22-23, 25-35, il, map
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Record #:
12031
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Abstract:
Including Weaverville, Swannanoa, Leicester, Arden-Skyland, and Candler, this article offers brief histories of the towns and cities comprising Buncombe County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 1, June 1957, p20-21, il
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Record #:
21821
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Abstract:
This article looks at how public poor relief was conceived and utilized as a social tool, with a particular interest in the emphasis placed on mass education by reformers in the 1840s and 1850s. Buncombe County and Asheville are used as a case study.
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Record #:
23906
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Abstract:
In 1975, Elvis Presley performed three shows in Asheville. Residents and attendees of those concerts remember Presley's visit as they prepare for celebrating the event's 40th anniversary.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 9 Issue 4, July/Aug 2015, p48-50, 52-53, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24003
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Abstract:
Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joyce Kilmer was an American poet, writer, and Sergeant, and is remembered in this article that details his impressive scouting operations into dangerous territory and his subsequent death in 1918 at the hands of a German sniper.
Record #:
24011
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The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
24024
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The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
24072
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Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
24084
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Abstract:
The author discusses the time period from the close of the Civil War through the first years of the 20th century, specifically focusing on significant events in Asheville during the time period known as the 'Gilded Age.' The author focuses on the McKee family and their time at the historic Smith-McDowell House.
Record #:
24085
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Abstract:
The building that houses Grove Arcade is a historical icon in Asheville and first opened in 1929. The Grove Arcade was opened by Wiley Grove (1850-1927), who made his fortune initially by selling 'Grove's tasteless Chill Tonic.'
Record #:
24091
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Abstract:
The author discusses the French Broad River's name origins and the various myths surrounding its nomenclature.
Record #:
24092
Abstract:
The Estes-Winn Antique Car Museum is housed in a building that used to be used for the production of fabric. Now, Asheville locals can visit the Museum to examine restored cars from early-to-late 20th century.