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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for Turk, John
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Record #:
23612
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Douglas Ellington (1886-1960) helped to paint and camouflage World War II vessels from enemy German submarines. He accomplished this by painting patterns on the hulls that masked the ship's class, sailing direction, and speed.
Record #:
23924
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The intersection of Patton and Lexington Avenues is home to one of Asheville's most historic corners. The northwest corner was the site of the Grand Central Hotel during the nineteenth century, the Bon Marche department store from 1910 to 1923, and the S.H. Kress & Co. 5-10-25 Cent Store through 1975.
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Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24011
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The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
24021
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The Men's Garden Club of Asheville, in celebration of its 75th anniversary, is in charge of redoing the Olmstead Plan on a historic house in the area. The Olmsted brothers landscaped the \"Buck House\" in 1898, and the Garden Club seeks to return it to its original glory.
Record #:
24072
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Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
24084
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The author discusses the time period from the close of the Civil War through the first years of the 20th century, specifically focusing on significant events in Asheville during the time period known as the 'Gilded Age.' The author focuses on the McKee family and their time at the historic Smith-McDowell House.
Record #:
24093
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Asheville's Pack Square is a treasure trove of architectural styles but the Jackson building draws the most gazes. Lynwood B. Jackson commissioned the building in the 1920s in order to create an icon with which to advertise his business ventures.
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Record #:
24102
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The author discusses the history of opera houses in America and the opening of Asheville's Grand Opera House in 1890.
Record #:
24130
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During the twentieth century, open-air farmers markets contributed the Asheville's development. The most prominent of the markets spread along South Lexington Avenue between Walnut Street and Broadway. Today, Asheville's Urban Trail celebrates the history of the market with pieces of art commemorating the importance of this place in Asheville's growth.
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Record #:
26923
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Joseph M. Gazzam built the Kenilworth Inn in 1890, following a tourist boom in Asheville due to the completion of the Western North Carolina Railroad 10 years prior. The hotel featured a number of amenities and had a prime location overlooking the Swannanoa River. Unfortunately, in April 1909, the hotel burnt to the ground, but in 1923, it was rebuilt and reopened as a resort hotel.
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Record #:
26926
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The building that once housed Asheville’s former Plonk School of the Creative Arts was built in 1925 and originally served as the headquarters of the Asheville Women’s Club. In 1941, the building became home to the Plonk School until 1964 when the school closed its doors. The building is now being divided into single family dwellings, but the exterior will still reflect the building’s history.
Record #:
26930
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Fletcher, North Carolina is home to Calvary Episcopal Church, where the “Westminster Abbey of the South” is located. Beginning in 1924, Rector Clarence Stuart McClellan Jr.—with help from the Daughters of the Confederacy—erected 18 granite boulders with bronze dedication markers near the church. Those honored included Jefferson Davis, Stephen Foster, Dan Emmett, and others.
Record #:
27312
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The Blue Ridge Parkway was constructed during the middle 20th century to connect the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Many homesteads were relocated due to eminent domain and the process of roadway construction. Many left behind belongings and furniture now considered folk art. These pieces of folk art can be seen on display in Asheville at the Asheville History Center as part of the Blue Ridge Parkway Exhibit.
Record #:
27313
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville’s Flatiron Building is a unique example of architecture and the neoclassical style designed in 1926 by Albert C. Wirth.