NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Hotels, motels, etc.
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte motel mogul Sam McMahon, Jr. and his son Sam III recently stunned investors by filing for bankruptcy. The investors stand to lose a collective total in the millions of dollars.
Record #:
12062
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's hospitality industry is experiencing growth with hundreds of new hotel and motel rooms becoming available to travelers in 1982 and 1983. The article includes a listing of representative cities where construction is underway.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p18-20, 22, 53, il
Record #:
14878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising rates in full-service motels, like Holiday Inn and Ramada Inn, have created a gap between them and the lowest motel chain, Motel 6. Enter Days Inn of America, Red Roof Inn, Super 8 Motel and others to fill the gap between the high and low places. This means big profits for two North Carolina-based economy chains - Charlotte-based Econo Lodges of America and Winston-Salem-based Cricket Inn.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 1985, p27-30, 32, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
24011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
27603
Author(s):
Abstract:
The historic Jack Tar Motel in Durham will be renovated to a boutique motel after years of decay have affected the property. What will happen to residents who have lived illegally at the Durham landmark for the last ten years is uncertain. Ronnie Sturdivant, the property’s former owner, ran a flophouse out of the hotel’s rooms, but neglected fixing many of the problems. The hotel will be the site of future businesses, a sports bar, a lounge, and 74 rooms for rent, but will not include its current tenants.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 31, July 2014, p12-14 Periodical Website
Record #:
30243
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's tourist facilities across the state have added more than 1500 rooms since last summer. To meet rising tourist demands, newly listed rooms are available from the mountains to the coast, from cottages to motor courts, ranging in price from $2 to $24.
Record #:
35860
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many towns in the Highlands, the past was within reach. Inns making times distant tangible included Green Park, modeled after the classic mountain hostel; Snowbird Mountain, with a proximity to Joyce Kilmer Forest; and High Hampton, whose land was once part of Civil War general Wade Hampton’s estate. Other lodgings offering an experience not to be found in history books, they included Eseeola Lodge, on the National Register of Historic Places; the Weld House, with boarding house origins; and Appalachian Inn, offering home-grown meals and a bell summoning guests to dinner.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p58-60
Record #:
35911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lodging profiles boasting hospitality offer a mountain of proof. Those with long standing reputations: Fairfield Inn, established 1896; Monte Vista Hotel, established 1919; Stonehearth, presently an inn, formerly antique shop and restaurant. Lodgings with a more recent reputation for comfort: Hound Ears Lodge and Club, Floridians comprising fifty percent of membership; Waynesville Country Club Inn, guest list including fraternities on ski trips; and Fontana Village Resort, fireplaces in their rooms; Sunshine Inn, inspired by the bed and breakfasts in Ireland.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p46-47
Record #:
35910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Defining this customer service marker was the word’s origin: acronym for “To Insure Promptness.” Highlighting its importance for employees was this knowledge: tips were the sole source of income for many hospitality industry employees until the late 1960s. Explaining its enduring importance was discussion of the standard tip rate. Underscoring its mutual value was ways it benefits servers and those served.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p44-45