NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Grissett, Ellen
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12516
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grissett discusses the profession of architecture as it is practiced in North Carolina where 1,400 architects turn ideas into reality. Corporate Design and Realty Magazine lists six of the state's architectural firms in its annual ranking of the country's top 200 firms. The article includes a photo spread of prizewinning designs.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 45 Issue 5, May 1987, p16, 18-23, 51-52, il, por
Record #:
14745
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism was a large part of Asheville's economy at the turn of the century, but it soon gave way to manufacturing and other businesses operating in the western part of the state. Manufacturing still contributes about $312 million to the economy, but tourism is making a comeback. The Asheville Chamber of Commerce projects tourism revenues of $245 million in 1985 and that tourism will become the city's number one industry in the next three or four years.
Source:
Record #:
14749
Author(s):
Abstract:
On May 15, 1985, the Biltmore Estate Winery will open, marking the start of a new industry for Biltmore House & Gardens. It is the brainchild of William A. V. Cecil, grandson of George Vanderbilt who built the Estate. Production will start with 25,000 cases a year, and officials predict that by 1994, the winery will be producing 100,000 cases a year.
Record #:
14753
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mirror-making is a fairly crowded business, but Carolina Mirror stands out from the rest. Ed F. Garner founded the company in North Wilkesboro in 1936. Recently edged out of the number one position in the world by a German manufacturer, Carolina Mirror is now the world's second largest mirror-maker and largest in this country. In the beginning the company sold mirrors to furniture makers, but has expanded to retail mirrors and distributor mirrors. Carolina Mirror posted sales of almost $50 million in 1984.
Source:
Record #:
14747
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tom Clark, a professor of religion at Davidson College, began carving gnome-like creatures as a hobby. The hobby has now grown into a thriving, multimillion dollar business. Clark's statues of gnomes and wood spirits have made him one of the best known sculptors in the country and one of the most prolific in the figurine industry.
Source:
Record #:
14756
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1972, Ed Mayorga bought R & E Electronics, a struggling Wilmington telecommunications company, for $3,000. Although the company had been in business since 1952, it had a less-then-wonderful financial status, making about $36,000 in yearly sales and holding a $70,000 deficit. Mayorga paid off the debt in three years, and today he expects the company will see $25 million in sales in 1985.
Source:
Record #:
14874
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mobile home construction in the state is doing very well. Figures from the Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI) for 1984 rank North Carolina third in the number of units manufactured with 28,197. Only Texas and Georgia produced more. Two of the four major third tier companies are located in the state - Oakwood and Conner. They soon may be joined by a third as Manufactured Homes, Inc. of Winston-Salem has announced its entry into the manufacturing side of the business.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 10, Oct 1985, p22-24, 26-29, 32-33, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
14879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dee Birke and Rick Ray of Charlotte maxed out their credit cards in 1978 to buy the television rights for their first sports venture - the Great Alaska Shootout. They gambled that die-hard N.C. State basketball fans would tune in to see their team. They did, and Raycom Sports was born. It is now the country's largest sports syndication company, growing from $80,000 in net advertising sales in 1979 to a projected $30 million in 1985.
Source:
Record #:
14878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising rates in full-service motels, like Holiday Inn and Ramada Inn, have created a gap between them and the lowest motel chain, Motel 6. Enter Days Inn of America, Red Roof Inn, Super 8 Motel and others to fill the gap between the high and low places. This means big profits for two North Carolina-based economy chains - Charlotte-based Econo Lodges of America and Winston-Salem-based Cricket Inn.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 1985, p27-30, 32, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
14887
Author(s):
Abstract:
New York, Los Angles, and Chicago are the top three cities in television commercial production, with Miami, Dallas, Atlanta, and Nashville being the top Southern cities. Although Charlotte ranks slightly below the group, it has five formally structured, full-service production companies doing work inside the state and beyond. The city's reputation as a commercial maker is largely unknown to all but industry insiders, but that could easily change through the work of the city's five production companies.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Mar 1986, p12-14, 16, 18, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
14938
Author(s):
Abstract:
Family firms are big business in North Carolina. Built on blood ties and marriages that sometimes go back generations, they make up about one-third of the state's top one hundred private companies. Grissett discusses with owners some of the problems in running a family business.
Record #:
24386
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preparing meals for airline passengers is big business. Sky Chefs Inc., one of the nation’s largest airline catering companies, serves flights departing from Raleigh Durham International Airport.
Record #:
24408
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents the MedFirsts businesses in North Carolina, doctor’s offices that are open long hours and every day of the year. These businesses represent just one aspect of the changing face of medicine in the U.S. Humana is the corporation behind the new medical centers that are opening at a surprising rate.